Seven Myths. Nay: Seven Follies (III)

24 febbraio 2009 michele boldrin

We need a larger fiscal stimulus.

[This is part III of a seven-part (!) discussion. Part I, II and IV ...]

3. The fiscal stimulus is going to do wonders

The greatest fiscal stimulus of all times has just been approved. Various people (including a large number of economists) have tried to explain why, on the one hand, the stimulus, as conceived, would have not been able to solve the problems we are facing and, on the other hand, it could worsen the situation if it contained the kind of measures the actual stimulus package ended up containing. Because I have written so much recently on this topic, I just summarize here things published elsewhere. They may not be intellectually original - in fact, they certainly are not original at this point of the debate - but these are the facts.

First: it is a fantasy that the economic profession at large finds the "stimulus" and the "bank bailout" plans sensible and adequate. Most economists I know oppose them: fiscal stimuli either do not work or work too slowly, and bailing out bad managers is never a good idea. These two, plain and simple as they sound, are the basic reasons why most economists, and not only "fresh-water" economists, oppose both measures. These measures are instead supported by most politicians, advisors to politicians, professional pundits, and all kinds of businessmen from failing industries. I am not surprised. Supporters of the plans are a minority among academic economists outside the administration: both plans contradict four decades of research and are designed to please special interest groups. But then, monetary policy and banking regulation have also shared these defects for the last two decades, so I am not surprised to see the bailout approved and hailed as the solution to our problems.

Second, a very large fiscal stimulus plan is potentially damaging because it raises the outstanding amount of debt, and we are already deeply in debt: being deeply in debt has brought us to this crisis, nothing else. Am I repeating myself? Yes, I am but then: has someone argued HOW on Earth you get out of "being deeply in debt you could not afford" by taking on even more debt? Further, the Japanese experience of 1992-2003 shows that even gigantic public spending plans are of no help when the banking system is paralyzed and kept alive artificially. Japan's public debt grew from about 60% of GNP in 1993 to 155% in 2004 and then to 194% in 2008, but it really made no difference: growth started again only after 2003/04, when the banking system was "cleansed" through a number of failures, mergers and plain "digestion". Is THAT the plan?

 

Third: not every fiscal measure is wrong, just most. For example, the extension of unemployment benefits is not controversial; in fact we may even need more of that. The tax cuts are deficient because they do not reduce tax rates. Research recommends cutting the Social Security and income tax rates for low earners. Most of the projects are either "make work" or the money won't be spent in time to have much impact on the crisis; this is true of half of the expenditure. While the actual amount devoted to true pork may not exceed a quarter of the total, some large expenditures on broadband and "green" projects are pork-like in that they do not really increase productivity. When you add it up, about two-thirds of the expenditure is not really useful, while the tax cuts should be redesigned. In other words, even conditional on pretending that "spending per-se is good for growth" (which it is not), the design and composition of THIS specific spending is bad and should be rejected.

 

Fourth: tax cuts are a better way to stimulate the economy, particularly this time. Research shows that supply-side miracles are voodoo economics, hence I do not expect miracolous jumps in GNP following the tax cuts. Simply, I claim they are the most useful fiscal policy tool in this moment. Income tax cuts would have the double positive effect of leaving money in the pocket of workers whose wages are being reduced and lowering the cost of hiring for new firms, which is exactly what we need to speed up the labor reallocation process. It is argued that tax cuts are saved rather than spent. Tax cuts targeted on lower income workers will enable them to "save" by paying off credit card debt and meeting mortgage terms. That will help relieve stress in the financial sector and housing markets. The one thing that 'stimulus supporters' do not understand is that a massive labor-reallocation process is taking place in the economy and that it is the consumption (demand for consumption) of those losing their jobs and searching for a new one that needs to be sustained ("smoothed-out"). You do not sustain the consumption demand (or the credit card's bill payments) of recently fired Circuit City employees by spending hundreds of millions of dollars in making rural Nebraska wireless! You sustain the consumption demand of those Circuit City former workers by giving them a tax break on their previous salary and on the new one, plus effective unemployment benefits in the meanwhile. So, if supporting demand is really what one needs (not obvious) the pseudo green projects are good for nothing. Cuts in tax rates of the working people are.

 

Fifth: Is there a case for public borrowing now to finance a stimulus package? People are worried about the future and are sensibly reducing their spending. Does this imply the government should step in and do the spending for them? Put that way, the idea seems like a non-starter. If we are poorer, so is our government. It will collect fewer, not more, taxes. On the other hand, government borrowing is cheap right now, and labor costs relatively low. If we accept this logic, then we reach an interesting conclusion - the additional spending now should be offset by less spending in the future. Sadly the approved plan does not say anything of the sort. And therein is the problem: in spite of President Obama promises of cutting deficit in a half by 2013, there is no commitment to cut spending in the future. Hence, he must plan to raise taxes.

 

Sixth: The money being spent to aid state budgets will prevent cutbacks in existing services. This should have some positive effects. Still, it encourages the states to continue to be irresponsible in their budgeting, which is why they are in so much trouble. It should have been accompanied by stringent requirements imposed on the states to get their budgets in order, but it wasn't. The greatest problem with the bailouts has been the lack of willingness to make those responsible be responsible. CEOs who bankrupted their firms get to keep their jobs; state governments that spent irresponsibly get bailed out with no strings attached. Larry Summers has repeated for years that "moral hazard" is a problem only in abstract models and not in reality: the facts prove him wrong. I admit this is not an original remark but it is, nevertheless, a fact.

 

Hence, what economic sense does the mega stimulus make (everyone understands the political one, i.e. pleasing people that are asking for taxpayers' money)? Waiting for next week when Brad De Long will finally explain me why I am so wrong and confused, I have looked around in various places. They all say the same thing: there is unused capacity to be employed. The capacity is unused because "demand dropped". Why "demand dropped" no one asks, or answers.

 

Dean Baker writes, perfectly summarizing the logic shared by every "super stimulus supporter" (Dean being one of the most active):

With consumption, housing, non-residential construction, and investment all collapsing, the economy is in a free fall. The federal government is the only entity that has the power to stop the decline.

In other words: everything is a matter of demand. Because demand, for no good reason, suddenly dried up, we are in troubles. People have suddenly, and irrationally, decided not to spend anymore. Hence, the government must spend even if it does not have the means for it. OK, let's proceed.

The Obama stimulus can begin this process. It will immediately make hundreds of billions of dollars available to state and local governments through various channels. This will allow them to maintain vital programs like unemployment insurance and Medicaid and allow them to put off the mass layoffs they are currently planning. The funds for infrastructure and energy conservation should also be an important source of employment growth in the economy in the next two years.

Let's not argue over the statement that the planned expenditure will produce "growth ... in the next two years". Let's just pretend it is useful and it is not the waste that, in my evaluation, at least 1/3 of the expenditure actually is. To spend now, the Federal Government will have to borrow resources from somewhere, correct? I mean; even assuming (which is an incorrect assumption) that ALL the workers employed by the stimulus are currently un-employed or will be un-employed in the near future, it is still true that in order to pay their salaries upfront we need to borrow resources from somewhere else. Because the private sector is contracting, certainly the additional resources needed to finance the extra public sector expenditures must come from somewhere other than taxes on the private sector. Question, where will they come from? They must come from someone's savings, right? Whose savings? The Chinese's? China is contracting as rapidly as the USA, or more: I doubt we will see a surge in their purchases of US T-bills. So, from where? From where will it come? It must come from the private sector in the USA and the EU countries, right? Good, so it amounts to crowding out saving that would, otherwise, have flown to investments in the private sector, or to consumption. It is a matter of budget constraints, nothing else.

In other words, we are changing the composition of aggregate demand, scarcely its level. Obviously, we may claim we KNOW that the new composition is better, more productive, more growth-inducing than the one that would have realized without the expenditure portion of the stimulus. Do we have any proof that this is the case? Not that I know. Anything we know suggests the opposite. Hence, even assuming that the additional public expenditure generates demand for productive capacity that would otherwise remain unused or idle, it does so by reducing demand for other productive capacity that will become idle. Where, in this process, the "multiplier" appears, beats me.

The biggest problem with the stimulus is that it is nowhere near large enough. The combined loss of demand due to the collapse of bubbles in both residential and non-residential real estate and the loss of consumption following the loss of $15 trillion in household wealth is close to an additional $2.6 trillion over the next two years. President Obama originally proposed to counter this with an $800 billion package, which the compromise version effectively cut to $700 billion (the $70 billion annual adjustment to the Alternative Minimum Tax is not stimulus).

Indeed, we need another trillion after this ... keep digging: we may find oil, eventually. Now THAT would be a stimulus, wouldn't it?!

 

Versione italiana ora disponibile cliccando sulla bandierina accanto al titolo

31 commenti (espandi tutti)

Hence, the government must spend even if it does not have the means for it.

 

And it might be not just a matter of financial means only. Have a look at this (from the WP)!

(I work on public procurement in Italy... could this be the right time for me to look for a job in the US? :-D)

giovini mi sono permesso di segnalarlo a greg mankiw che sta facendo la raccolta dei pro e con :)

Interestingly, Brad DeLong, in the other article linked by Mankiw, appears much less gung-ho than other supporters of the stimulus plan: for one thing he refrains from invoking the Keynesian multiplier for government spending (he just says that "[t]he government’s money, after all, is as good as anybody else’s"); and he does not exclude the risk of a morning-after hangover ("For the answer to that, we will have to wait and see").

Jeffrey Sachs is also not particularly enthusiastic. Excerpts:

We need to avoid reckless short-term swings in policy.  Massive deficits and zero interest rates might temporarily perk up spending but at the risk of a collapsing currency, loss of confidence in the government and growing anxieties about the government’s ability to pay its debts. That outcome could frustrate rather than speed the recovery of private consumption and investment. Deficit spending in a recession makes sense, but the deficits should remain limited (less than 5 percent of GNP) and our interest rates should be kept far enough above zero to avoid wild future swings.

and

In short, although the sharp downturn will unavoidably last another year or even two, we will not need zero interest rates and mega-deficits to avoid a depression or even to bring about a recovery. In fact, the long-term, sustainable recovery will be accelerated by a policy framework in which the budget credibly returns to balance over several years, the government meets its critical responsibilities in social services, infrastructure and regulation, and the Fed avoids dangerous swings in interest rates that actually contribute to the booms and busts we seek to avoid.

Sachs also points out an obvious economic truth: unless spending is reduced in the future (an alternative he does not contemplate) bigger deficits now mean higher future taxes.

We should also avoid further gutting the government’s revenues with more rounds of tax cuts. Tax revenues are already too low to cover the government’s bills, especially when we take into account the unmet and growing needs for outlays on health, education, state and local government, clean energy and infrastructure. We will in fact need a trajectory of rising tax revenues to balance the budget within a few years.

Sachs also points out an obvious economic truth: unless spending is reduced in the future (an alternative he does not contemplate) bigger deficits now mean higher future taxes.

Yup ... maybe he is reading us?

Fifth: [...] On the other hand, government borrowing is cheap right now, and labor costs relatively low. If we accept this logic, then we reach an interesting conclusion - the additional spending now should be offset by less spending in the future. Sadly the approved plan does not say anything of the sort. And therein is the problem: in spite of President Obama promises of cutting deficit in a half by 2013, there is no commitment to cut spending in the future. Hence, he must plan to raise taxes.

More seriously, I believe that - aside for Krugman, various religious believers in fix-price (fixed prices in days like these!) models of the liquidity trap, and people working directly for the Obama's administration - most sensible economists are realizing the total futility of fiscal stimuli in the current situation. Better late than never, but kind of late. Had they realized it a year or two ago, we would have not wasted the last two years and a few hundred billions to achieve nothing.

The problems are the banks, the banks, the banks, and the financial markets. People may not be realizing it, but thanks to two years of policy blunders, following ten years of irresponsible policies, we may be reaching the point of no return within a couple of weeks. This is getting scary my friends, and I am starting to believe that real, great scale disaster is now possible. Little to do with the markets, lots to do with politicians and insiders playing games. Stay tuned, more later.

Yeah, I guess it's better to spend overnight truckloads of money the government doesn't have on welfare for a select group of bankers.

And that -55% three-month return is before you factor in the implicit subsidy to banksters due to underwriting preferred stock at higher prices than the market prices of the time.

Oh no, I am even more against TARP (1, 2, and 32) than against the stimulus!

I thought that was pretty clear from PREVIOUS posts.

Ok, tonight we will make THAT point quite explicit by explaining why the new round of "creative" proposals (Caballero's, Bulow&Co's and so on) on "how to save banks at zero cost" are all equally ... well, equally not convincing let's say, just to be polite.

Michele,

some explanation of the Caballero proposal would be much appreciated. I could not get the benefits and costs of his proposal and the exact mechanics of its implementation. Thanks

f

P.S.

I'm not sure you did have the chance to look at my reply on the generalized asset inflation (here at the bottom of the page).  

You can find plenty of details in his page, here.

P.S. I had not seen the other comment, sorry ... we do not have a secretary and sometime one is unable to follow. I will answer there, in a moment. Then I go to bed :-)

At UC Davis, yesterday. Rumors that a video will be posted soon. In the meanwhile, as a starter, we got this interview.

in the meanwhile, somewhere else on the east coast, somebody fights on TRULY SMART regressions......whithout loosing political correctness (hard to believe, isn't it?)
Enjoy: http://gregmankiw.blogspot.com/2009/03/wanna-bet-some-of-that-nobel-money.html :-)

At UC Davis, yesterday. Rumors that a video will be posted soon.

The video is now available on that page.

EDIT: just a few comments on the debate.

- Kudos to Michele for neatly sidestepping the initial strawman built and thrown by Brad to equate the signatories to Andrew Mellon, Montagu Norman, "Republicans", and snakes and snails and puppy dog tails. Or perhaps, judging by how aback he was taken when at one point Michele said he agreed with him, Brad was sincerely ill-informed about Michele's positions: after all, in one occasion in the past century he even awarded myself an FDR tie (eek!) just for having defended him from a pack of bloodthirsty leninists ;-)

- In Michele's place, I'd have raised sooner the issue (eventually brought up by a guy in the audience) of the time lag between a spending package and any possible effect. Brad insisted that the stimulus was a quick plaster on the bleeding artery of occupational levels, to be applied even before undertaking the repair of the financial system, but that's not the official line of the Obama administration: Larry Summers back in December emphasized that the spending plan must have a substantial long-term component, and anyway the oft quoted Romer-Bernstein paper forecasts that the stimulus will make a difference in the occupational levels mostly in 2010-2011 (see chart at page 4). On the other hand, if we had the financial system fixed now (and we really need that for yesterday) there wouldn't be any "idle cash" to worry about, because banks could lend deposits to the enterprises.

- Another question I would have asked Brad, ever keen of fingering shrill "Republicans" for all the ills of the world, is who was Treasury Secretary in 1999 when the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act (one of the few laudable initiatives of the New Deal era) was signed into law (answer: Robert Rubin until July, when he left for a remunerative job with Citi, and Larry Summers thereafter). Incidentally, Rubin (together with Greenspan) also strongly opposed proposals of regulation of OTC derivatives brought by the CFTC's chair Brooksley Born in 1997.

Bacchettate a parte - che, date da uno con il track record di Guido Rossi, fanno solo onore - ciò che impressiona di quell'articolo è, da un lato, l'ottusita' del personaggio - non ha nemmeno capito che la chiosa finale di JMK va inquadrata nel constesto delle previsioni fatte nell'articolo e che, quindi, va intesa come un augurio per il futuro utopico che disegna (nel quale il "problema economico" è diventato praticamente irrilevante) e non come un insulto o quant'altro agli economisti - e, dall'altro, l'incomprensione del, ed il livore per, la ricerca economica, che non capendo disdegna.

Un classico caso di volpe intellettualmente sfigata che insulta l'uva incapace di raggiungere ...

Insomma, il commercialista di Sondrio della destra ha ora un suo eccellente imitatore nell'avvocato di Milano della sinistra. Una coppia perfetta: la degna sintesi intellettuale delle elites italiane.

Re: Keynes

andrea moro 6/3/2009 - 13:10

Io sono stupefatto: l'articolo discetta di cosa JMK conosca o non conosca senza mai entrare nel merito delle questioni sollevate. Sembra che il tipo abbia "commissionato" la ripubblicazione del saggio di JMK per scrivere una risposta alla collezione di saggi curata da Pecchi & Piga. Non so se questa ricostruzione dei fatti sia corretta, in ogni caso non so perche' tanti si stupiscano del motivo per cui i blog abbiano piu' succcesso della carta stampata. 

Su Il Giornale di oggi Michele in una gustosa intervista risponde alle critiche di Guido Rossi: 

http://newrassegna.camera.it/chiosco_new/pagweb/immagineFrame.asp?comeFrom=rassegna&currentArticle=L316X

Bell'intervento, Michele.

Ma com'è che si pubblica una tua intervista sul tanto vituperato fogliaccio berlusconiano (del quale io avevo già fatto notare le non infrequenti prese di posizione vicine all'idea liberale, anche in contrasto con le posizioni del capo, contraddicendo chi lo schifava "a prescindere" .....), anziché su qualche "moralmente superiore" quotidiano strabicamente (demo)sinistro?

Btw, tanto per rimanere nelle more della nostra amichevole querelle, che cosa pensi di questa alta espressione di competenza economica in simbiosi con l'evidente amore per l'idea liberale? Davvero, non mi par proprio, costui, un'alternativa credibile alle sconcezze di cui siamo - e ci è toccato sempre essere - testimoni ..... :-)

Ma com'è che si pubblica una tua intervista sul tanto vituperato fogliaccio berlusconiano (del quale io avevo già fatto notare le non infrequenti prese di posizione vicine all'idea liberale, anche in contrasto con le posizioni del capo, contraddicendo chi lo schifava "a prescindere" .....), anziché su qualche "moralmente superiore" quotidiano strabicamente (demo)sinistro?

Perché son tutti contenti di dare qualche (meritata) bacchettata al dottor Rossi Guido, ed a me sembrava opportuno contribuire a sifatta intrapresa. Insomma: "convergenze parallele", caro Doktor Franz, solo convergenze parallele. L'unico vantaggio, ma proprio l'unico, di non appartenere a nessuna processione è che, di volta, in volta, si può scegliere il carro da cui farsi dare un breve passaggio ...

P.S. Tanto per non smentirmi. L'originale conteneva (fra le altre) anche la seguente che non ha purtroppo potuto apparire in stampa per ragioni di spazio :-)

 Come le ho detto prima: in Keynes c’e’ tutto ed il contrario di tutto, dipende dai giorni, dai testi, dal pubblico che voleva affascinare. L’uomo voleva, anzitutto, affascinare, vincere, essere ammirato, sentire che la gente attorno a lui era d’accordo con lui e lo riteneva “er mejo”. Ha presente l’attuale presidente del consiglio italiano? Ecco, una personalita’ molto simile.


 

P.S. Tanto per non smentirmi. L'originale conteneva (fra le altre) anche la seguente che non ha purtroppo potuto apparire in stampa per ragioni di spazio :-)  Come le ho detto prima: in Keynes c’e’ tutto ed il contrario di tutto, dipende dai giorni, dai testi, dal pubblico che voleva affascinare. L’uomo voleva, anzitutto, affascinare, vincere, essere ammirato, sentire che la gente attorno a lui era d’accordo con lui e lo riteneva “er mejo”. Ha presente l’attuale presidente del consiglio italiano? Ecco, una personalita’ molto simile.


Carto, l'hanno tolto per lo spazio, quel periodo...se l'avessero pubblicato ci sarebbe stato davvero meno spazio.

Eh, lo spazio, si sa, è tiranno ...... :-D

Ma tu - confessa - l'hai messa di proposito quella frase ........ "per vedere di nascosto l'effetto che fa" (vengo anch'io, no tu no .....)

Ma tu - confessa - l'hai messa di proposito quella frase ........ "per vedere di nascosto l'effetto che fa" (vengo anch'io, no tu no .....)

Confesso d'averla lasciata di proposito. Venuta m'è venuta spontanea, lo giuro! Il gigionismo istrionico e la propensione alla menzogna detta con la faccia di tolla più di tolla del mondo sono veramente comuni ai due. Poi ce ne sono delle altre, ma lasciamo stare ... una differenza, credo, possa essere la statura ...

P.S. Avevo visto le cose di Di Pietro sui prefetti: pietose. Ma non aspettarti che una cazzata verbale compensi mille ruberie reali, Doktor! Comunque, in effetti, la cultura economica del Di Pietro è quella che è, meglio non è. Vorrei scommettere, a naso, che la grande maggioranza degli italiani (piccoli imprenditori inclusi) pensa che, in effetti, quella dei prefetti non è poi una gran brutta idea. Tu che dici? Chiedo sul serio.

Vorrei scommettere, a naso, che la grande maggioranza degli italiani (piccoli imprenditori inclusi) pensa che, in effetti, quella dei prefetti non è poi una gran brutta idea. Tu che dici?

Guarda, pur non scommettendo sulla totalità dei piccoli imprenditori confindustriali (che la mamma degli .... eccetera eccetera), ti posso dire che nel recente consiglio regionale veneto PI, al quale ho partecipato, nessuno considerava seriamente la possibilità che il Giulio intendesse proprio affidare la sorveglianza ai prefetti. Anzi, era convinzione comune - anche di un alto funzionario della regione Veneto, ospite in quell'occasione - che si trattasse di mettere a disposizione le sedi ed una sorta di "ufficialità" utile a conferire valore certificato alle decisioni del "tavolo" di confronto, per risolvere casi specifici, senza concedere, così, possibilità di interpretazioni soggettive.

Parrebbe, invece, provarci davvero per mettere all'angolo Mario Draghi (reo di offuscare la Sua luce, persino nella considerazione - quale scorno! - del FT) e, magari, come parte integrante di un disegno relativo al controllo generale dell'economia.

Non vorrei, però, far troppa dietrologia, che non mi piace ..... e mi auguro (ci auguriamo), evidentemente, che alla fine delle schermaglie si torni al buon senso.

By the way, stasera, rispondendo nell'altro tuo post con un po' di calma, sarà anche il caso che mi prenda la briga di puntualizzare il significato (anche se, prescindendo dallo slogan mediatico ed andando a leggere le precedenti dichiarazioni, dovrebbe essere chiaro .....) dei "soldi veri" che citava Mrs. President sabato al convegno di Palermo ..... :-)

Attendo lumi su cosa intenda la vostra Mrs Presidente ... su Caterpillar, giusto dieci minuti fa, le ho consigliato di sgolarsi per chiedere riforme vere che servano a qualcosa, dall'università alle pensioni, invece di soldini ...

Sulla questione dei prefetti: non vi rendete conto che anche solo l'idea di un "tavolo" di confronto sulla concessione del credito alle aziende è follia? È un passo indietro? Non solo non abolite i tavoli in cui vi confrontate ogni due per due con governo e sindacati su ogni questione inerente al mercato del lavoro e paraggi, ora aggiungete anche il tavolo regionale o provinciale per somministrare il credito? Ma cosa volete diventare, Cuba?

Mah ...

Ah, ma le cubane non sono da buttar via ..... :-)

Venendo al tema, i tavoli in oggetto (che dovrebbero sostanzialmente esser composti da rappresentanti territoriali di aziende e banche e che, lo ripeto, non hanno bisogno del prefetto ma solo di chiarezza e serietà .....) non servono a somministrare credito ma a dirimere contrasti su specifiche situazioni.

Il fatto è che il sistema creditizio lancia continuamente proclami di grande attenzione alle necessità delle imprese, vantando ampliamenti di liquidità che in realtà, sul territorio, rimangono sempre sulla carta. Anzi, non sono infrequenti situazioni difficili, ad esempio dovute ad improvvise richieste di rientro dai fidi (solitamente parziale), anche in casi che non ne darebbero motivo, legate a tardivi eccessi di prudenza o ad immediate esigenze di cassa dei singoli istituti di credito. Essi hanno tutti i diritti di decidere la propria politica aziendale ma, evidentemente, così agendo (tra l'altro in modo diverso da quanto asseriscono pubblicamente) non fanno che acuire i problemi di liquidità oggi diffusi e che derivano dall'allungamento dei tempi di pagamento in atto - primi tra tutti quelli della PA, ormai scandalosi e colpevolmente non affrontati dal governo, nonostante continue proteste e pubbliche denunce - anche quando non vi siano insoluti (che pure sono in crescita).

Il sistema produttivo vive, oggi, una grande insofferenza nei confronti degli attori finanziari che - si sente continuamente dire con rabbia, giusta o sbagliata che sia - hanno provocato il guaio ed ora lo vogliono far pagare ad altri. Monta, perciò, la richiesta di costringere il sistema bancario alla coerenza tra "dire e fare", senza più concedere prese per i fondelli: ormai in qualunque riunione alla quale partecipino imprenditori - specie piccoli - il rancore è palpabile ed eventuali rappresentanti del credito sono oggetto di attacchi non sempre oxfordiani ......

Io non so se questi tavoli saranno efficaci. Lo spero, è un tentativo, ma penso, in realtà, che serviranno a poco giacché l'azione risolutiva può essere solo governativa, nel senso che sarebbe necessario approntare un serio fondo di garanzia per le PI, coinvolgendo i Confidi, oltre che, naturalmente, procedere all'immissione di liquidità nel sistema pagando - lo ripeto - i fornitori della PA e dando la possibilità alle imprese di patrimonializzarsi, eliminando l'odiosa ed iniqua tassazione degli utili (per le aziende che nel 2008 ancora ne hanno avuti, e ci sono) che rimangono in azienda, anziché essere distribuiti.

Dopo di che, Michele, tu hai 10, 100, 1000 volte ragione quando sostieni che bisogna risolvere i problemi strutturali di questo disgraziato Paese, proprio approfittando della crisi: ne siamo tutti ben consci - lo diciamo anche spesso - e cerchiamo di operare in tal senso nel nostro "particulare". Di me lo sai, ma non sono certo l'unico e sono convinto che lo sappia benissimo anche la gran parte dei politicanti - di qualunque colore (beh, forse non i seguaci del "rosso acceso" ......) che fanno orecchie da mercante o che promettono e non realizzano, preferendo l'ottusa ricerca dell'immediato tornaconto personale che prevale grandemente nel 99% di costoro.

Franco, permittimi un paio di domande. Se richiedere un intervento per i ritardati pagamenti della PA è sacrosanto, perchè considerare i tavoli presso le prefetture una possibile soluzione (sebbene parziale)? Perchè dei privati (le banche) devono mettere una pezza ai problemi creati dallo stato? Non vedi il rischio che in futuro il ruolo delle banche tocchi a qualche industria, a cui il governo di turno chiederà (imporrà) di contribuire a risolvere qualche altro problema creato dallo stato?

Non mi sorprendo che le banche o i banchieri non hanno problemi con una logica del do ut des, ma almeno una parte del settore industriale (quella che compete sui mercati mondiali) davvero non si rende conto che il rischio è rimanere invischiati nella logica dei favori a scapito della concorrenza? Comprendo la frustrazione verso le banche, ma se c’è un problema con le banche (oltre alla PA), la risposta dovrebbe essere più mercato e più concorrenza nel settore finanziario, non il tavolo prefettizio (IMHO).

 

No, Giuseppe, non confondiamo problemi differenti. Evidentemente non mi sono spiegato bene, dando per scontate alcune cose.

I tavoli presso le prefetture non sono una possibile soluzione per i ritardati pagamenti della PA, ma solo un modo per costringere le banche alla coerenza con le dichiarazioni rese e, contestualmente, ad utilizzare le facilitazioni di origine pubblica sul mercato, anziché dedicarle al proprio consolidamento, cioè per limitare le conseguenze delle porcherie combinate negli ultimi anni. Ti faccio notare, ad esempio, che Alessandro Profumo citava dati di confronto tra settembre 2007 e settembre 2008 (cioè, tempi in ogni caso precedenti all'esplosione della crisi!) a sostegno, in una recente occasione pubblica, della tesi che Unicredit aveva stanziato risorse aggiuntive per favorire la liquidità delle imprese. La reazione di un anonimo partecipante all'incontro, che se ne è uscito con uno stentoreo “si vergogni” dal centro della platea, chiariscono molto bene quali siano gli escamotages dialettici di quei personaggi e quale il sentimento che suscitano. Ripeto, sono piuttosto scettico in merito alla reale efficacia dei tavoli, ma si può provare, purché si lascino i prefetti alle loro (inutili?) occupazioni e non si pretenda di risolvere, così, i problemi strutturali.

Resta inteso, e non mi stancherò di ripeterlo – ma tutto il sistema lo fa, non solo io che conto nulla …. - che qualunque governo non può pensare di cavarsela con misure emergenziali di questo tipo, pure in qualche modo sperimentabili e magari utili, ma deve mettere a disposizione risorse che sono semplicemente il dovuto e decidersi, una buona volta, ad avviare un processo di riforme sempre più necessarie. Questo sarebbe il momento, ma non vedo segnali in tal senso e temo si perderà ancora una volta l'occasione.

Caro prof. Boldrin, "mi consenta" (per dirla col nostro caudillo), non sia troppo machiavellico. Da indefettibile ed eroico lettore della Granma berlusconiana le assicuro che le sbandate liberiste nelle pagine del Giornale sono una patologia conclamata. Ancorché filogovernativo a tutta prova, nei temi di attualità economica si confrontano regolarmente due linee, una liberista e una diciamo "neo statalista-tremontiana": possiamo fare i nomi di Nicola Porro (il liberista) e del leggendario Cirino Pomicino. (La stessa succede nei temi "etici": i mangiapreti sono rappresentati dal terribile Filippo Facci, e anche il vecchio Mario Cervi diserta purtroppo dall'ortodossia clericale). Nelle pagine "culturali" il Giornale è il solo quotidiano importante a dare spazio regolarmente e con una certa sistematicità alle ragioni del liberismo economico. Anche qui si affrontano spesso i "tremontisti dell'Occidente" come Geminello Alvi e gli "austriaci" come Carlo Lottieri. Nel paginone che le hanno dedicato (che domani sarà possibile vedere in pdf nel sito del Giornale) oltre ad una grande fotografia del grande Keynes ed una piccola fotografia del grande Boldrin (siamo ancora nel 2009) c'è appunto un articolo di Lottieri, che è anche più cattivo di lei verso l'incantatore di serpenti britannico.

E' vero, non arrivano a scrivere "abbasso Tremonti", ma insomma è cosa che lasciano intendere alla ben nota perspicacia del lettore medio del Giornale. Cose turche, che a Repubblica si sognano.

Ancorché filogovernativo a tutta prova, nei temi di attualità economica si confrontano regolarmente due linee, una liberista e una diciamo "neo statalista-tremontiana"

Gia', ma la funzione di base del Giornale alla fin fine e' quella di sostenere il PdL, e li' i rapporti di forza sono ormai chiari: qualche "token free-marketer" come Martino e Della Vedova ogni tanto e' lasciato parlare al deserto per accreditare ipotesi di liberalismo economico', mentre la linea d'azione e' fermamente in mani stataliste e neocorporative (oltre che aziendaliste).

Aggiungerei che, per recuperare i punti persi (nella mia personale classifica) ospitando gli articoli di un ineguagliabile personaggio quale Paolo Cirino Pomicino che ha offerto un esempio mai più raggiunto (ma, si sa, al peggio non c'è mai fine) di devastazione del bilancio dello Stato, avrebbe bisogno che il resto della squadra fosse composta da penne super partes.

Ho deciso di essere noioso. Perciò segnalo, dopo la non casuale intervista a Boldrin, l'ennesima paginata "liberale" del Giornale berlusconiano. Da domani disponibile in pdf nel sito del Giornale per chi ne voglia apprezzare l'evidenza grafica.

http://www.ilgiornale.it/a.pic1?ID=337342&LINK=MB_T

Inizia una nuova discussione

Login o registrati per inviare commenti