Seven Myths. Nay, Seven Follies (IV)

24 febbraio 2009 michele boldrin

Of traps and mice.


4. We are in a liquidity trap.

From a conceptual point of view this is the argument most often invoked by "economists" arguing in favor of gigantic fiscal expenditure plans. Krugman was preaching the liquidity trap during the 1990s, and he was talking about Japan. We have already seen how useful public expenditure was there. He has not changed his mind, which is, again, not a surprise to anyone.

The argument is: "people" are so eager to hold liquid assets (currency) that it would take a hugely negative nominal rate to convince them to purchase real assets, i.e. to invest. Said it in reverse: expected nominal rates of returns on investments are so low that investors are willing to borrow if and only if lenders charge them negative interest rates, i.e. only if lenders pay an interest to their borrowers. Because this is an impossibility (borrowers will then borrow an infinite amount), we are in a liquidity trap. People hold cash and do not invest, everyone goes unemployed.

Notice that, in order for the argument to have any bite (not the bite PK&Co argue it has, but just any bite) it requires believing that it is monetary policy that, by lowering the nominal rate, induces people to take on productive investments. If you believe, as I do, that monetary policy is scarcely, if at all, effective as a tool to generate growth when economies are not growing, then the whole debate becomes irrelevant. In other words, for the liquidity trap argument to be even worth pursuing we need to believe that monetary policy matters big time. No matter, let's continue.

The key point is the following: "trap theorists" argue that we observe households not consuming or purchasing any real asset because they like to keep too large a share of their income in cash. Literally: cash under the mattress, because a bank deposit is income invested - banks around here offers positive interest rates on deposit; banks in Europe offer very high nominal rates (4% to 7%) for deposits lasting more than 3 months - so it cannot create a "trap", at least not in the sense they need it (see below).

Now: how much evidence we have of this behavior? Not statistical, just anecdotical evidence. I have none. I have not heard of households withdrawing cash from banks deposits and keeping it at home. Instead, everywhere, we hear of people complaining because they cannot borrow to finance their expenditure in durable goods or what not. We hear of firms that are not receiving credit or are receiving credit only at very high nominal interest rates. Certainly, people are purchasing more liquid assets (T-bills, CDs, and so on) and fewer illiquid ones (shares and corporate bonds) than two years ago. The reason for this, apparently, is that people expect negative rates of returns from investing in the shares and corporate bonds. Are they wrong or are they right? Trap theorists need to assume people are dead wrong: there's money to be made in many of the investment projects that are not being financed, but households are missing those opportunities and sitting on cash.

The issue, then, is: what may change people expectations about rates of return on illiquid investments? Are people "wrong"? As a matter of logic, we cannot rule this out. But the burden of the proof is on trap-theorists. They need to convince us that:

1) We are on a sunspot. This whole thing is a sunspot, due to private sector's expectations coordinating suddenly in the wrong direction. Actual returns from investments are good, we just do not understand it. Hence we do not invest. We sit on piles of cash and rather starve than take the good opportunities firms are offering us. I have no strong evidence to reject this statement, what do I know? Still, do PK&Co have any evidence supporting their statement? Not that I know.

2) Assuming 1) is correct, public spending, massive public spending, is the correct tool to make everyone optimistic again. We need to be convinced of this. In other words, not only you need to convince me this is just a sunspot, you need to convince me that I will abandon this sunspot and go back thinking straight again (were we thinking straight in 2006, at the peak of the bubble?) only if the Federal Government decides to make central Montana and Southern Idaho wireless, or to build more schools in Milwaukee, or give more money to Medicare for the elderly to purchase Viagra. Well, the last one is not so bad: it may indeed produce a few more smiling people in the public parks, which is uplifting. In any case, this must be proved. Assuming 1) is correct, my hunch is that President Obama's speeches have a bigger chance of lifting the American Spirit than wirelessing North Dakota does. But, then, I may be wrong: I have worked only briefly on sunspots ...

This is the logic behind the liquidity trap story and the claim that only a couple of trillions of public spending will get us out of it. It is not incoherent, it is just not credible. Those are two different things, indeed. It's an expectations-based story (as they have finally figured out even in the anointed circles: my colleague Costas Azariadis had been claiming it since early 2007...), a story we understand very well in THEORY. Now, where's is the EVIDENCE? Not only: where is the EVIDENCE EXPECTATIONS WORK LIKE THAT?

While we wait for the evidence, let me try a brief and simple alternative explanation of the same facts.

There is no liquidity trap, there is a "precautionary bank reserves trap", and this cannot possibly be cured with more public spending and public debt. Households are hoarding nothing, households are saving as much as they can because they are deeply in debt (some of them, not all, but enough of them are), their assets are clearly worth less than before and their expected incomes are not growing anymore. Saving to pay debt is the same as investing, hence household are investing by giving money back to the lender, when they can, and defaulting, when they cannot. No liquidity trap here.

Banks are making losses when households default on debts, and are receiving cash when households pay back debt or make a deposit. Banks are also receiving an enormous amount of cheap reserves from the Fed and they react by hoarding cash and excess reserves with the Fed. Why are they doing so? They are doing so to avoid going bankrupt. Not only they are desperately afraid of the mounting losses on some of the loans households cannot pay; they are even more afraid of the time bombs called generically "derivatives" they are still sitting upon. It is that fear that paralizes them. They are afraid of the consequences of their careless choices of the last ten years; choices that, they claimed, were profitable and from which they extracted "profits" (biiiig profits) and bonuses (even biiiiiggger bonuses). Those profits did not exist, and all that money should have remained in the banks, as capital reserves, to avoid insolvency now.

Note, it is not the shareholders of banks that are paralized, those are already dead and economically irrelevant as they almost lost all their capital (Citibank was worth less than Unicredit today, and Unicredit was worth 1/8 of its old value yesterday!). The managers of the banks are frozen: they lost the shareholders' money and do not like the idea of losing the empires they are sitting upon. It is a nice job to be the bosses of Citi, Bank of America and so on. It makes you a master of the universe, indeed. Why giving it up voluntarily if you do not have to?

So that's the trap, and it is not a liquidity trap. It is a "banking trap" or a "principal-agent trap": it has to do with the banks, their solvency or lack of it thereof, their misterious portfolios, and the desire of banks' managers to keep their nice and well paid jobs. The same thing, exactly the same thing, happened in Japan after 1993/94, so there is nothing new here, really. Will gigantic public spending change ANYTHING along these dimensions? I very much doubt it. Certainly, there is neither theory nor empirical support for such a claim. Right now, the best strategy for bank managers is to pile up reserves (they even pay like T-bills), plead for a bailout, and not lend unless the investment is super safe. In fact, to the extent that four or five very big players have a decisive impact on the US interbank market, "lending little" is clearly a dominant strategy. And little they lend, we are told.

Hence we, the mice, are certainly in the(ir) trap. I am not sure it is liquid, though ...

73 commenti (espandi tutti)

Roberto Perotti 23 novembre 2003

http://rassegna.camera.it/chiosco_new/pagweb/immagineFrame.asp?comeFrom=search¤tArticle=JYTZ1

Pietro Reichlin 11 febbraio 2009

http://rassegna.camera.it/chiosco_new/pagweb/immagineFrame.asp?comeFrom=search¤tArticle=KQMK5

 

Giovanni Dosi 04 febbraio 2009

http://rassegna.camera.it/chiosco_new/pagweb/immagineFrame.asp?comeFrom=search&currentArticle=KNYAW

Marco Lippi e Luigi Marenco 25 febbraio 2009

http://rassegna.camera.it/chiosco_new/pagweb/immagineFrame.asp?comeFrom=rassegna¤tArticle=KVVCO

Un grazie a Michele per le sue puntate controinformative rispetto alla vulgata che ci propinano i giornali domestici e non solo

Michele,

Credo che questo sia il miglior articolo che io abbia letto sulla crisi economica (forse perche', a parte un maggiore scetticismo sulla possibilita' che ci sia anche un bel po' di "sunspot trouble", dice quello che gia' pensavo ;-).

Spero che lo pubblicherai anche da qualche altra parte con una diffusione maggiore di nFA (che e' bella e cara, ma temo che la leggiamo in quattro gatti).

P.S.

Dettagli:

1) mi piace "banking trap", anche se sempre un tipo di liquidity trap e'; "principal-agent trap" e' forse espressione meno adeguata visto che, a questo punto che la fregatura l'hanno presa, ormai anche gli azionisti e i creditori vogliono che la "loro" banca si attacchi a tutta la liquidita' che trova;

2) typo: "anointed" si scrive con una enne sola.

I would say that we are in a Debt trap, rather than in a Liquidity trap. Until a couple of years ago the inflated value of assets was the well accepted collateral that backed the loans. Leverage was not a problem, because it was hidden behind collateral. Now the value of assets has gone. Everyone can see that the system as a whole is burdended with excess debt. Leverage has become a big problem (high leverage is associated with high risk premium). By any measure lenders are engaged to curb their own risk exposures. If the former borrowers are not able to keep the terms of their debt the room for new borrowers gets narrow. That is on the balance sheets side.

On the income (flows) side, the links are much more complicated. Well, if wealth did not affect consumption and if firms did not need banks to finance trade, probably the negative effects on GDP would be small. If wealth drive, at least partly, consumption behaviour (not only overall expenses but also choices among different items),  low than desired endowments call for additional saving and firms do rely on banks for their funding needs, then the negative effect on income is there. Subsequently there are the feedbacks. How big these effects can be is hard to establish. What we have seen in the last months is a flow of new downward revisions of GDP estimates, as updated and worse statistical data have been released.

I would highlight a couple of additional points. If we could push the price of assets to the former 'before the slump' level could everything be fixed ? If so we would simply be again in a 'waiting for the crisis' stance. Alternatively there should be another path which should lead somewhere else. I would expect that this different path be marked with different relative prices (CPI vs assets prices). The question that I would ask is:"If we reinflate succesfully assets prices should we expect (or accept) as necessary by-product inflated consumer/commodity prices as well?" On the other hand if assets prices are not inflated and are let lo settle to a new equilibrium against consumer prices, relative prices will be different than before the crisis (CPI will not be lower with respect to asset prices). Maybe in between there are other possible equilibria.

 

Michele, how about the Tremonti Bonds? It is an alternative to public spending and it provides banks with liquidity to lend to small and medium size firms. It seems to me that the liquidity constraint of these firms is one of the biggest problems of the crisis, as it implies firms going bankrupt not because they are not profitable but because they don't get payed by their debtors (which, in turn, get not payed by their own debtors). And banks do not lend money to firms as they fear they will not repay the debt.

However, I still don't see the incentive of banks to subscribe these loans. Apparently banks do not have shortages of liquidity (am I right?), problem is that they don't want to lend to potentially defaulting firms. So why should they subscribe loans at the 8.5% interest rate per-year, that force them to use that money mainly to lend to firms? Am I missing something in the incentives of private banks?

So why should they subscribe loans at the 8.5% interest rate per-year, that force them to use that money mainly to lend to firms?

I try to make a couple of ponts to answer this question. First of all, we're speaking about hybrid securities, something between equity and debt; hybrids cannot be used in repos with the ECB (so, by buying them, you are locking your liquidity until final maturity - unless you are keen to undertake selling risk); moreover, hybrids are quite subordinated, so the lender is less protect and should require a higher return. Secondly, these bonds are included in Tier 1 calculation, so they improve issuers "equity" reducing the credit risk of the banks. And Tier 1 bonds yield today is quite larger than 8.5%...

E' tutto molto corretto, più volte avevo letto,e anche io scritto, che non c'è una trappola della liquidità, ma una "banking trap, anche se, come notato anche da Valter Sorana, potrebbe essere un aspetto della trappola della liquidità non considerato (almeno fino ad oggi).

Quello che voglio aggiungere, e di cui tu parli senza affondare, ma ponendo delle domande è questo: tutti i manager delle istituzioni bancarie e finanziarie se ne devono andare a casa. Loro è la colpa, loro sono stati i bonus quando gonfiavano la bolla, loro per primi devono lasciare. Altrimenti che mercato è ?

Se io sbaglio il giorno dopo mi mangiano vivo le banche, i creditori, i miei impiegati. Questi sbagliano (inconsapevolmente ?) e niente: tutti lì sorridenti a chiedere soldi (i nostri !). E' ora che si cominci a parlare non solo degli aiuti, giusti o sbagliati, alle isitituzioni, ma anche di chi ha fatto partire il casino, ed è ora che paghino. Qualcuno ha pagato ?

Sottoscrivo e, come chi mi conosce ben sa, non da oggi. Fanno fastidio quelli che ripetono continuamente "io l'avevo detto" ma non mi trattengo dal farlo questa volta: sono anni che lo vado dicendo. Infatti, da ben prima che esplodesse la bolla dotcom ...

Non ho MAI considerato i super bonuses dei bancari altro che estorsioni ed appropriazioni indebite di riserve di capitale. Il numero V e VI conterranno una valutazione un po' più articolata della questione.

Non ho MAI considerato i super bonuses dei bancari altro che estorsioni ed appropriazioni indebite di riserve di capitale. Il numero V e VI conterranno una valutazione un po' più articolata della questione.

Propongo un altro modello teorico per spiegare i super-bonus. Ritengo che i super-bonus siano "naturali" nel senso che corrispondono ad una percentuale delle masse di denaro movimentate paragonabili (probabilmente inferiori) alle percentuali che il fruttivendolo guadagna vendendo frutta e verdura, anche grazie alla bilancia tarata leggermente a suo favore, e vendendo carta e imballaggi allo stesso prezzo della merce. Finche' tra guadagno e piccoli imbrogli il fruttivendolo estrae profitti corrispondenti al piu' del 5-10% oltre il prezzo che farebbe il fruttivendolo ideale onesto e non avido, gli acquirenti semplicemente non se ne preoccupano.

I super-manager hanno a che fare con clienti piu' attenti, ma in fin dei conti sono sottoposti a minore concorrenza dei fruttivendoli, specie quando dirigono grandi banche o le principali banche d'affari. Pertanto sia in maniera perfettamente lecita, trasparente e concordata con azionisti e clienti, sia con trucchi paragonabili a quelli del fruttivendolo come spostare a posteriori le date di acquisto delle stock options ai minimi storici, estraggono guadagni che sono analoghi a quelli del fruttivendolo ma proporzionali a masse molto superiori di risorse movimentate.

In teoria, una concorrenza perfetta dovrebbe portare i compensi dei super-manager ad un prezzo di mercato che corrisponde all'offerta di manager qualificati.  Ho forti dubbi che cio' possa mai accadere quando Stato per Stato le maggiori banche si contano sulle dita di una mano, tantopiu' che le banche sono anche piu' opache dei fruttivendoli nel pubblicizzare i prezzi omnicomprensivi dei loro prodotti e servizi.

In conclusione, temo che non sia possibile fare molto oltre quanto si sta facendo nei paesi civili, come gli USA, dove i super-manager vengono efficacemente incarcerati per un congruo numero di anni, per davvero, quando la fanno troppo grossa (M.Milken, K.Lay, e cosi' via). Nei Paesi poco civili come l'Italia si potrebbe certo fare molto meglio rispetto a quanto si sta facendo con Tanzi, Fiorani, Consorte e i loro colleghi del passato, ma l'inefficienza della giustizia risparmia costoro piu' o meno come risparmia rapinatori, tangentisti e violentatori.

Ci sarebbe un altro modo per ridurre gli extra-profitti dei super manager, e sarebbe quello di porre limiti del genere anti-trust sui vari mercati di riferimento in misura molto maggiore allo standard, per esempio negli USA si potrebbe mettere un limite anti-trust a 1/100 della raccolta bancaria del risparmio senza che - a mio modesto e non qualificato parere - le dimensioni delle banche siano penalizzate per la scala insufficiente.  Gli extra profitti rimarrebbero, pero' sarebbero almeno moderatamente ridotti dalla maggiore concorrenza, e darebbero meno fastidio perche' sarebbero proporzionali ad un fatturato inferiore e beneficierebbero piu' persone.

Tuttavia cio' contrasta con gli interessi che ogni Stato ha che le sue imprese raggiungano dimensioni elevate per poter prendere il controllo di imprese piu' piccole di altri Stati.  Per cui temo che provvedimenti di questo tipo siano improbabili senza un accordo esteso a gran parte delle maggiori economie.

Alberto il modello teorico per spiegare i superbonus e' parecchio piu' semplice a dirla tutta: se posso costruire un portafoglio con rendimenti (attesi) asimmetrici, e in particolare con negative skew, posso ottenere rendimenti positivi per un periodo limitato puntando sul fatto che gli extraprofitti cosi' conseguiti saranno gia' stati distribuiti (sotto forma di dividendi e bonus) nel momento in cui gli eventi nella parte sinistra della distribuzione si realizzeranno; il giochino funziona abbastanza bene perche' la moda e' maggiore della media, quindi finche' non si verifica il patatrac quella che vedi e' una performance brillante e praises to the brilliant bankers and their winning strategies.

Anche questa strategia non mi sembra per nulla banale da contrastare. La mia impressione e' che per quante regole si possano pensare qui il mercato e' destinato a fallire, e chi e' ai vertici di imprese molto grandi riuscira' a fare grandi guadagni privati nelle fasi ascendenti del mercato, socializzando le perdite quando le bolle finanziarie scoppiano.

Dillo a me. A me questa cosa "bugga" da parecchio tempo, anzi: al di la' della formalizzazione di un "contratto" che tuteli il principal in una situazione come quella che ho descritto (non ho la piu' pallida idea di come si puo' fare ma credo che se gli azionisti di Citi avessero dato 1 milione di dollari a Sandro qualche idea gliela tirava fuori volentieri), quello che mi perplime ancora di piu' e' che una banca col sistema attuale avra' sempre in mano una put scritta dallo stato che gli garantisce implicitamente soccorso per salvaguardare il sistema dei pagamenti. E, razionalmente, se ho in mano una put per quando le cose vanno male è ovvio che la mia avversione al rischio magicamente si riduce.

State dicendo la stessa cosa che dice Beppe Grillo in questo preciso momento !

Non seguo Beppe Grillo, che di mestiere, se non ricordo male, fa il comico. Se dico le stesse cose devo essere preoccupato, contento, allegro ? O devo temere di essere accusato di plagio ?

Scusami, non volevo dire niente altro che, a me come imprenditore, fa specie che managers che hanno commesso errori (e che errori!) stiano ancora lì al proprio posto. Per venire ai fatti di casa nostra: Profumo e Bazoli sono ancora lì, inamovibili, come il management del Monte Paschi, che non ha referenti azionari, ma politici.

Adesso grazie della segnalazione, mi vado a leggere Beppe Grillo.

State dicendo la stessa cosa che dice Beppe Grillo in questo preciso momento!

Solo che io so perché la dico.

A me sembrano tutti d'accordo (nel senso che tutti aderiscono allo stesso club esclusivo a cui si accede per cooptazione o meccanismo equivalente). Si potrebbe riassumere con la seguente massima "cane non mangia cane" (a proposito, come si dice in inglese ?).

Lasciando da parte l'ironia mi sembra però che il problema principal-agent sia piuttosto arduo. Infatti anche se si facesse un'asta al ribasso (per le retribuzioni richieste) per scegliere il management, quest'ultimo, una volta insediato, avrebbe in mano le redini del potere (anche di fare danni) e gli azionisti sarebbero soggetti ad un potenziale ricatto. Per evitare conflitti devastanti per l'azienda preferiscono pagare. Naturalmente il gigantismo di molte companies è parte del problema, perchè accresce il potere che il CEO acquisisce ipso facto con la propria nomina e le grandezze che può influenzare.

 

.

in order for the argument to have any bite (not the bite PK&Co argue it has, but just any bite) it requires believing that it is monetary policy that, by lowering the nominal rate, induces people to take on productive investments

I'm not convinced: can't you attain the same results with good old inflation? Inflation is the cost of money, so you should be able to stimulate investments by raising inflation, shouldn't you?

Vincenzo, thanks for making your point above, I now see better why banks should buy these sort of hybrid bonds. 

Allow me to answer your question now. In general, lowering the nominal interest rate induces people to hold more money. With more money in the system, there will be higher inflation in the future. So reducing nominal interest rates is one way to increase future inflation.

You're absoluetly right, I did a poor job in questioning Michele's sentence. My view was, if I raise the money supply, I'm raising inflation expectations, too. This should induce people to spend more today (buying goods); but what if people are looking to save because they are in trouble as Michele pointed out? They shouldn't hold money, because it loses value equal to the inflation rate; so they should invest in anti-inflation assets (e.g. equity). Am I right?

Ti rispondo in italiano che ormai siamo gli unici a scrivere ancora in inglese in questo post. In teoria hai ragione. In pratica, nella situazione corrente, no. Nel senso che dato che la liquiditá non viene spesa i prezzi non salgono. La gente non compra (risparmia) e le imprese non investono (perché come dice Michele le banche non gli danno i soldi) e la liquiditá non entra effettivamente nel sistema ma rimane nelle banche. L'inflazione attesa rimane bassa. Quindi la gente non é molto interessata a comprare titoli. Fianlly, lo spread tra il rendimento sui depositi e quello sui titoli dello stato é risibile, guadagni un pelino di piú se compri BOT invece che tenere i soldi sul conto corrente. E le azioni in questo momento non hanno rendimenti attesi molto alti e un rischio molto elevato.

In altri termini, si sta riducendo la velocità di circolazione della moneta (MV = PQ).

Mi pare un commento eccessivamente generoso, nel senso che "a naso" è soprattutto la teoria che mi sembra sbagliata - cioe' mi viene il dubbio di aver tralasciato qualche pezzo. Potrebbe essere l'avversione al rischio: con l'aumento della volatilita' la media dei rendimenti puo' anche essere uguale ma la dispersione aumenta, quindi per quella cosa che mi pare si chiamasse "equivalente certo" agenti avversi al rischio dovrebbero accettare un rendimento reale certo anche negativo al posto di accettare il rischio di investire in qualcosa che ti fa perdere ancora di piu'.

Per curiosità, ci sono studi sugli effetti del leverage americano sulla crescita globale?

Mi pare un commento eccessivamente generoso, nel senso che "a naso" è soprattutto la teoria che mi sembra sbagliata - cioe' mi viene il dubbio di aver tralasciato qualche pezzo.

Vincenzo, cosa intendi per commento generoso? Quale teoria ti sembra sbagliata? Ti riferisci al perchè la gente non compra azioni quando i tassi sono cosi bassi?

Oggi ho stipulato un mutuo con tasso di interesse ben al di sotto del 4% (euribor + 0,80).

Constatavo col direttore della banca che i tassi stanno precipitando ai livelli di cinque anni fa, quando ci fu il momento d'oro per l'indebitamento fondiario, con una fondamentale differenza: cinque anni fa erano le banche ad inseguire e sollecitare i potenziali clienti offrendo sino al 110% del necessario, attivando una rete di mediatori creditizi, tagliando gli spread, stipulando convenzioni con le agenzie immobiliari e così via.

Oggi, invece, le banche sono terrorizzate, non solo non  finanziano più del 70/80% del valore dell'immobile, ma selezionano i propri debitori, informandosi non solo del reddito del potenziale mutuatario, ma anche del suo datore di lavoro (quanto è solido, che rischi ci sono che la ditta possa chiudere e così via). Non a caso i primi a fare le spese di questa restirizione del credito sono stati gli immigrati, che al momento sono tagliati fuori dal mercato.

La sensazione mia e del direttore è stata che non sono i soldi a mancare, quanto la voglia di rischiarli da parte delle banche, il che è più o meno quello che afferma Michele (se ho ben compreso il suo articolo)

La sensazione mia e del direttore è stata che non sono i soldi a mancare, quanto la voglia di rischiarli da parte delle banche, il che è più o meno quello che afferma Michele (se ho ben compreso il suo articolo)

Si', pero' mica solo da parte delle banche. A quale fornitore va di far credito ai clienti in un momento come questo?

Non so se sia chiaro, per cui lo specifico, che la "trappola bancaria" non riguarda gli investimenti (anche se Michele correttamente associa l'acquisto di case a un investimento , ma poi non va oltre, per cui sarebbe una forzatura attribuirgli cose  non dette), ma riguarda proprio il "polmone finaziario" di cui tutte le aziende hanno bisogno per vivere e sopravvivere.

Mi spiego semplicemente: solo un pazzo finanzierebbe gli investimenti con il credito a breve, i mezzi più usati (per le PMI, ovviamente) sono leasing e mediocredito, il discorso su questi due strumenti è lungo, e qui non ci interessa.

Invece le banche hanno stretto, quando non chiuso, tutti (o quasi) i conti di aziende con rating Basilea 2 E,D,C, sui B e A si mantengono ancora, anche se stanno aumentando gli spread. Chi aveva fidi di 100.000,00- 200.000,00 euro si è visto chiedere, dalla sera alla mattina, o il rientro immediato, o un piano di rientro a max 180 gg. Parliamo di aziende anche con 30 anni di esistenza. Questa è la "banking trap" attuale: non riguarda (se non marginalmente rispetto alle cifre in gioco) gli investimenti, riguarda la vita delle aziende. E il primo che cede si tira giù tutti gli altri...

E continuo: mettiamo il caso che i famigerati "GT Bonds" servano solo per investimenti, è evidente che sarebbe una presa in giro, non si sono fermati (solo) gli investimenti, si è fermato il ciclo vitale.

Mettiamo caso che GT, invece di farfugliare si dia una svegliata e sblocchi i pagamenti dello stato verso le PMI per xzy miliardi di euro (non so nemmeno più quanti sono, aumentano giorno per giorno..), questo sarebbe il gesto giusto, che darebbe liquidità al sistema, ma poi chi se li sente Geronzi, Passera, Profumo...

Michele, più che un gatto chi ha un'azienda si sente un topo..

Mettiamo caso che GT, invece di farfugliare si dia una svegliata e sblocchi i pagamenti dello stato verso le PMI per xzy miliardi di euro (non so nemmeno più quanti sono, aumentano giorno per giorno..), questo sarebbe il gesto giusto, che darebbe liquidità al sistema, ma poi chi se li sente Geronzi, Passera, Profumo...

Esattamente. Peccato che ne parlino sempre ma non lo vogliano fare, se non in misura marginale, forse perché significa distogliere risorse da interventi mediaticamente più paganti e, naturalmente, per non dispiacere ai cari amici banchieri, i quali - come giustamente facevi notare - stanno ancora tutti sulle loro dorate poltrone, nonostante i pessimi risultati ottenuti. In realtà, nonostante l'ammontare imponente del debito della PA verso fornitori (che anch'io non so più quanto sia oggi, ma che già a fine ottobre era di circa 70 miliardi e non credo proprio sia diminuito .....) la possibilità d'intervento in questo senso non sarebbe così peregrina: la Cassa Depositi e Prestiti dovrebbe avere disponibili un centinaio di miliardi, teoricamente destinati ad opere infrastrutturali che, però, non si fanno e, comunque, mi pare prioritario evitare il soffocamento delle imprese, con le ovvie drammatiche conseguenze economiche e sociali.

Aggiungo, inoltre, che un'altra buona mossa potrebbe essere la costituzione di un fondo di garanzia pubblica per gli affidamenti alle aziende, utilizzando la quota di TFR forzosamente trasferito all'INPS dal precedente ineffabile governo. Se non ricordo male, son circa 5 miliardi che, anche considerando una leva finanziaria prudente, consentirebbero un'azione efficace.

Sì, ma non è certo una novità. Anch'io - l'ultima ruota del carro, indeed ..... - ne ho già scritto in nFA (e non solo) e, soprattutto, Confindustria sta battendo su questo tasto da parecchi mesi, nei colloqui con il governo, negli appuntamenti pubblici e sui giornali. In particolare i vertici nazionali della PI confindustriale ne hanno fatto un tema fondante ed hanno ottenuto continue - e peraltro vane - rassicurazioni.

Se posso essere del tutto irrispettoso (va ben, concedetemi l'espressione retorica), mi sembra di stare al mercato delle vacche, dove si debba chiedere 100 per avere 1, nel senso che si citano con faticosissima perseveranza un'enormità di problemi e si ottiene qualcosina.

A puro titolo d'esempio, lunghe e travagliate trattative hanno portato la modifica richiesta in termini di aliquota fiscale per la rivalutazione degli immobili strumentali (ricorderete che inizialmente ere il 10%, poi il 7%, infine il 3%), peraltro senza la possibilità di utilizzo degli introiti per defiscalizzare gli utili che rimanessero in azienda (per chi li ha, naturalmente, ma bisogna pensare al futuro mettendo le aziende ancora sane nelle condizioni di non ammalarsi domani ......).

In ogni caso, continuare ad insistere, coinvolgendo il maggior numero possibile di commentatori, non fa certo male.

Il problema principale del Tesoro è il finanziamento del fabbisogno di cassa: debito in scadenza+deficit di cassa corrente. Dati i tempi che corrono, accrescere il fabbisogno accelerando i pagamenti, rischia di produrre ulteriori "tensioni" nel reperire le risorse necessarie. Altri paesi con uno stock di titoli in scadenza inferiore hanno maggior margine di manovra.

Sono perfettamente cosciente del problema che sta a monte di tale situazione. Tuttavia non basta dare una spiegazione - peraltro nota - ed occorre trovare il modo d'intervenire, almeno gradualmente, ad esempio come ho suggerito citando la CDP.

Ci provo. Si potrebbe chiedere al Governo, in deroga alla legge fallimentare, di stabilire che i crediti verso la PA con certe caratteristiche (da definire), preventivamente riconosciuti e accertati dalla PA e con pagamento canalizzato su una banca predefinita possano essere dati in pegno e anticipati dalla banca stessa (con inattacabilità/consolidamento immediata del pegno che non sarebbe soggetto ad eventuale revocatoria). In cambio della concessione il Governo/PA otterrebbero un piccolo adeguamento della scadenza standard (ma non oltre una scadenza massima) e per rendere possibile una corretta valutazione economica potrebbero fissare anche un tasso massimo di interesse. Forse gli altri creditori non sarebbero contenti.

 

Una proposta simile è già stata avanzata, ipotizzando una sorta di "certificazione del credito", ma si limita a trasferire il problema senza risolverlo alla radice ed, anzi, presenta il rischio di legare ancor più banche e PA. Non mi pare una soluzione praticabile.

Inoltre, la legge fallimentare - che ho già pesantemente criticato proprio per le distorsioni che induce - non ha certo bisogno di altre iniquità.

Franco hai mai visto un governo fare una cosa intelligente ?

Aggiungo, inoltre, che un'altra buona mossa potrebbe essere la costituzione di un fondo di garanzia pubblica per gli affidamenti alle aziende, utilizzando la quota di TFR forzosamente trasferito all'INPS dal precedente ineffabile governo.

O anche, anzichè sottoscrivere i GT bonds (allora i soldi ce l'hanno..) per le banche, costituire un fondo di garanzia rotativo a cui dare accesso alle aziende con rating Basilea 2 C e D (quelle maggiormente in difficoltà), per cui le banche, anzichè chiudergli il conto (come stanno facendo) accedono al fondo di garanzia come patrimonializzazione o propria del cliente, o propria della banca, così da non intaccare i criteri di Basilea 2 e essere coperi dal rischio.

Ma forse sarebbe una cosa troppo intelligente, troppo da libero mercato, e chi se li sente Passera, Geronzi, Profumo (che ha  appena garantito una linea di credito stand-by alla Fiat da 3 mld di euro..). Loro vogliono i soldi (nostri) per continuare a fare i cavoli (propri).


Aggiungo, inoltre, che un'altra buona mossa potrebbe essere la costituzione di un fondo di garanzia pubblica per gli affidamenti alle aziende, utilizzando la quota di TFR forzosamente trasferito all'INPS dal precedente ineffabile governo.

O anche, anzichè sottoscrivere i GT bonds (allora i soldi ce l'hanno..) per le banche, costituire un fondo di garanzia rotativo a cui dare accesso alle aziende con rating Basilea 2 C e D (quelle maggiormente in difficoltà), per cui le banche, anzichè chiudergli il conto (come stanno facendo) accedono al fondo di garanzia come patrimonializzazione o propria del cliente, o propria della banca, così da non intaccare i criteri di Basilea 2 e essere coperi dal rischio.

Le modalità d'intervento possono essere le più varie. A mio avviso l'importante è il cambiamento di approccio, che passi dall'idea "bancocentrica" alla volontà di supportare il sistema produttivo, a prescindere dal salvataggio del sistema creditizio così com'è ora, il quale mai sarà indotto a destinare tutte le risorse aggiuntive al finanziamento della cosiddetta economia reale, semplicemente perché lor signori hanno estremo bisogno di pararsi il culo .....

La proposta che ho sinteticamente riportato è una di quelle uscite da un recente vertice PI confindustriale - in presenza e con l'approvazione di Mrs. President -  e credo sia già stata recapitata al governo, sebbene non se ne senta parlare ed incontri, guarda caso, forti resistenze tra quei boiardi sindacal-statali che avevano ladrescamente ottenuto le risorse in oggetto.

Permettimi Marco, però, di non essere completamente d'accordo sull'ipotesi di supportare tutte le aziende con ratings Basilea 2 deficitari, per quanto tali classificazioni si siano rivelate inadeguate e si stia discutendo come modificarle. Esattamente come non dovrebbero essere salvate tutte le banche, le aziende decotte dovrebbero sparire, per lasciar posto a nuove iniziative più efficienti ed efficaci: semmai bisognerebbe pensare a destinare risorse finalizzate all'adeguamento delle conoscenze ed alla riqualificazione, in un'ottica di innovazione che permetta solidi sviluppi futuri. In questo senso, il sistema attuale - fatto a misura di consulente più che per le imprese e, troppo spesso, farraginoso e privo di serie verifiche - risulta mal congegnato ed andrebbe profondamente rivisto, prima ancora che potenziato. Certo che se, invece, si riducono gli stanziamenti ..........

Permettimi Marco, però, di non essere completamente d'accordo sull'ipotesi di supportare tutte le aziende con ratings Basilea 2 deficitari, per quanto tali classificazioni si siano rivelate inadeguate e si stia discutendo come modificarle.

Non ho pensato a salvare aziende decotte, difatti non ho inserito la E di Basilea 2 (nelle vacche grasse hanno dato soldi anche a quelle, lungimiranti 'sti banchieri), ma la C non indica assolutamente aziende decotte, anzi,saranno ai limiti della patrimonializzazione, ma sono in classe C aziende che fanno fior di utili.

Poi la classe D comprende anche tutte le nuove iniziative, poichè le aziende nuove non hanno storia partono da lì (mi ricorda la bonus/malus, più malus che bonus..). E che le banche non stanno proprio guardando i bilanci, la storia, ma prendono attivo/passivo, patrimonio netto e via. Un computer lo farebbe meglio di tanti scaldasedie bancari. Giusto poi per il gusto, ci sono tanti consulenti che falsificano i bilanci, fanno prendere la A a una società X e poi spariscono con il malloppo. E gli scaldasedie dormono..

Sul TFR sono sicuro che non se ne farà niente: hai mai visto Dracula rinunciare al sangue ?


 

 

Non ho pensato a salvare aziende decotte, difatti non ho inserito la E di Basilea 2 (nelle vacche grasse hanno dato soldi anche a quelle, lungimiranti 'sti banchieri), ma la C non indica assolutamente aziende decotte, anzi,saranno ai limiti della patrimonializzazione, ma sono in classe C aziende che fanno fior di utili.

Hai ragione, naturalmente. Portavo il discorso un po' al limite, perché oggi - con arditi inserimenti nelle giuste lamentele generali -  arrivano anche richieste di affidamento del tutto insensate, persino ai Confidi che, infatti, hanno il loro bel da fare a respingerle ......

Poi la classe D comprende anche tutte le nuove iniziative, poichè le aziende nuove non hanno storia partono da lì (mi ricorda la bonus/malus, più malus che bonus..). E che le banche non stanno proprio guardando i bilanci, la storia, ma prendono attivo/passivo, patrimonio netto e via. Un computer lo farebbe meglio di tanti scaldasedie bancari.

Ecco, questo è un punto nodale. Al sistema creditizio (almeno quello italiano, non so altrove) manca proprio la competenza per valutare le opportunità di business e, contestualmente, la voglia di assumersi un rischio imprenditoriale. Probabilmente è il risultato della recente follia finanziaria, che ha virtualizzato e drogato l'economia, ma nelle banche si sentono tutti maghi della finanza e pochissimi capiscono d'impresa. Del resto, gli incentivi erano tutti ad andare in quella direzione e le competenze non s'inventano dall'oggi al domani.

Ecco, questo è un punto nodale. Al sistema creditizio (almeno quello italiano, non so altrove) manca proprio la competenza per valutare le opportunità di business e, contestualmente, la voglia di assumersi un rischio imprenditoriale.

Credo che questo sia vero tuttavia ritengo che i veri problemi stanno ancora piu' alla radice: l'inefficienza e l'iniquita' della giustizia civile. In Italia e' oggettivamente pericoloso prestare soldi per attivita' imprenditoriali nascenti il cui successo necessariamente non puo' essere prevedibile, perche' ci si espone al rischio di truffe senza difesa efficace e tempestiva da parte della giustizia italiana.

Negli USA le imprese nascenti di alta tecnologia mi sembra vengano finanziate da fondi di venture capital piu' che da banche vere e proprie. C'e' un'alta mortalita' tra le imprese finanziate (con perdita totale dell'investimento) ma i profitti generati dai finanziamenti di successo (come anche Google) sono tali che a quanto ho letto il ritorno sull'investimento e' dell'ordine del 20-30% all'anno. Per raggiungere questo risultato tuttavia e' indispensabile che il fondo finanzi un numero elevato di imprese nascenti, per mediare statisticamente i rischi, e che la societa' in cui opera sia "sana" cioe' con prevalenza di aspiranti imprenditori onesti e una giustizia civile rapida ed efficiente che contrasti gli imbrogli, due condizioni che si sostengono a vicenda. Temo che in Italia siamo sull'equilibrio opposto, cioe' una prevalenza di imbroglioni e una giustizia inefficiente che si sostengono a vicenda. Piu' che puntare sulle capacita' di divinazione dei funzionari di banca, l'Italia avrebbe bisogno di una giustizia efficiente e di enti locali che non forniscano alle banche ghiotte occasioni per spartirsi illecitamente i soldi dei contribuenti con gli amministratori locali, per esempio con operazioni sui derivati.

In un altro commento ( probabilmente nel ramo sbagliato ) faccio riferimento anche io al venture capital.Penso come te che il venture capital sia una possibile via di uscita. La valutazione del rischio di business sarebbe delegata ai fondi specializzati nel venture capital. Se lo stato permettesse un forte vantaggio fiscale per i detentori di questi fondi, questi ultimi potrebbero essere  direttamente i risparmiatori. Lo stato non avrebbe esborsi di capitale immediato.

Potrebbe funzionare ?

Piu' che puntare sulle capacita' di divinazione dei funzionari di banca, l'Italia avrebbe bisogno di una giustizia efficiente

Alberto, concordo - e ci mancherebbe, col mestiere che faccio! - sul fatto che l'inefficienza delle strutture pubbliche, ed in particolare della giustizia, complichi la vita ad ogni attività imprenditoriale. Ovviamente, quindi, tale gravissima situazione scoraggia anche le nuove iniziative.

Dando per assodato tutto ciò, io intendevo semplicemente far notare che il sistema creditizio italiano non mi pare dotato delle professionalità necessarie (ma ancora più a monte, dell'imprinting culturale adatto) alla comprensione ed alla valutazione rigorosa e competente delle attività economiche, forse perché si era concentrato (pur non conoscendo bene l'inglese, come ha detto il valtellinese ....) su quella apparente cornucopia chiamata genericamente "derivati" o, più probabilmente, perchè il sistema di potere legato a quel mondo ha sempre avuto, sostanzialmente, nessun altro obiettivo che il proprio perpetuarsi.

Per quanto riguarda il fatto che ad occuparsi di finanziare gli start-up di imprese innovative possano essere i fondi di venture capital, che esistono anche in Italia (mi pare, ma potrei sbagliarmi, che siano 5), nulla da dire, ma tale specificità non inficia il discorso generale.

Invece, Raf, non saprei dire quale possa essere l'efficacia di un'agevolazione fiscale. Io son solo convinto che meno distorsioni si creano, tramite incentivi di vario genere, meglio è: mi sembra lo stesso discorso che tu stesso proponevi relativamente alla non convenienza dei motori elettrici per i veicoli stradali, che l'otterrebbero attualmente solo se favoriti da provvedimenti ad hoc. In generale, penso che non sia necessario spingere l'innovazione con iniezioni di spesa pubblica (spesso clientelare, oltre che inefficiente e difficilmente verificabile) ma, invece, sia indispensabile creare un ambiente favorevole alle attività imprenditoriali. Semplificazione, fiscalità, infrastrutture, servizi pubblici sono i temi da affrontare, tenendo ferma la stella polare del funzionamento di mercati concorrenziali, quindi non in mano a monopoli, tra l'altro spesso pubblici o da questi derivati.

Se lo Stato si fa carico di svolgere il suo compito in questi termini, ogni imprenditore che voglia rimanere attivo non può che puntare sull'innovazione e lo sa da solo ......

 

Ci ho pensato e secondo me il venture capital dovrebbe essere non tassato . E vero che l'imprenditore sa cosa fare ( se non altro per definizione ) ma è anche vero che l'imprenditore necessita di capitale .Questo non verrà dalle banche adesso e penso non sia venuto neanche in passato . La banca presta denaro corrente non capitale . Lo stato per contro avrebbe almeno 2 benefici : Primo nessun esborso immediato , secondo alimenterebbe lo sviluppo del know how sul territorio. know  how  ad alto valore aggiunto perchè già filtrato dai fondi di venture capital e dal mercato ( progetti finanziati ma falliti )

Sono in Spagna per lavoro "applicato". Tra ieri ed oggi ho incontrato almeno una trentina di banchieri e bancari (ossia, sia gente che dirige banche in cui possiede sostanziali azioni sia dirigenti delle medesime) sia di "banche-banche" sia di "cajas de ahorro", ossia casse di risparmio. Magari mentono - con bancari e banchieri non è mai impossibile per simpatici e agradables que siano - ma gli argomenti sono sempre gli stessi.

- Alcuni sanno di essere quasi insolventi, e non hanno intenzione di fare alcuna mossa, alcuna. Qualsiasi deposito o finanziamento trovino, se lo tengono stretto e non lo prestano di certo.

- Quelli che insolventi non sono sono comunque esposti. L'interbancario (che viene qui definito "mercado mayorista") genera pochissimo. L'Euribor, dicono tutti, sarà anche basso ma le transazioni che avvengono sono minuscole e pochissimi si fidano, prestando comunque solo a "fidati" o "collegati".

- Dal BCE ricevono, ma non più del 3% del fabbisogno, visto che la BCE ha quote nazionali "di fatto" e, ripetono tutti, i tedeschi ed i francesi s'incazzano se agli spagnoli arriva più del 10% del finanziamento totale di BCE via sconto. I depositi arrivano e sono la fonte di finanziamento principale. Ma, mancando le altre fonti, questa è la fonte principale per cui la concorrenza per raccogliere depositi è diventata forte. I tassi che vengono offerti sono fra il 5% ed il 7% ed anche un pelino di più. In sostanza, il costo del denaro da investire, per le banche spagnole, viaggia oggi attorno al 5-6%, altro che tassi zero!

- La domanda c'è, in quantità non è calata ma, visti i costi del finanziamento, è ovviamente "peggiore" (relativamente, ma anche assolutamente) del passato. Poiché ciò che conta è la qualità della domanda in relazione al costo del finanziamento, la qualità è calata sostanzialmente.

- Per cui, confermano, prestiamo sostanzialmente meno ed a tassi più alti.

Conclusioni, parziali, dal test spagnolo (che ritengo assolutamente credibile e significativo, credetemi sulla parola)

1. Altro che trappola della liquidità e tassi a zero!

2. Altro che "manca la domanda per consumo": manca il risparmio, mancano i fondi da investire, c'è molta meno offerta di risparmio, quindi il costo del prestito bancario (e non, sospetto) è molto maggiore che un anno fa.

La mia conclusione, al momento, è:

a) risparmiare di più per investire di più;

b) risanare le banche, o facendo fallire ed assorbire le insolventi o facendole acquisire da chi possa, da dovunque l'acquirente venga (e qui c'è tutto un libro da scrivere sul protezionismo nazionale delle banche di ogni paese, che è cruciale);

c) le prospettive d'investimento sono peggiorate. Questo può essere dovuto sia a mancanza di domanda (nel qual caso occorre chiedersi "che domanda" si può generare e come); sia a quella che io chiamo "l'ipotesi Levine", ossia che il meccanismo di crescita degli ultimi 15 anni (Cina, India ed emergenti - driven) si è inceppato a fronte del costo crescente delle materie prime. Sino a che non si riaggiusta il meccanismo di crescita, attraverso una sequenza di innovazioni che non so cosa siano e nessuno lo sa, la macchinetta della crescita mondiale non riparte.

Viaggio molto istruttivo, davvero.

questo commento è estremamnete interessante. Finalmente si spiega perchè i tremeonti bond all'8% sono così ambiti dalle grosse banche italiane . Si spiega anche perchè con un euribor al di sotto del 2 % la comunità europea ha fissato il tasso del 7,5 % come soglia tra aiuti di stato e non.

Io credo che le banche siano piene di bambini prodigio coi loro derivati e poco di dirigenti che sappiano valutare un business plan. Infatti non te lo chiedono neanche più. Il meccanismo di crescita si può rilanciare in un solo modo , attraverso il venture capital su aziende innovatrici. Prima di internet, delle telecomunicazioni, e dei geni della finanza quello che ha prodotto risultati è stato il venture capital ( finanzio 5/10 aziende e quella che realizzerà il prodotto vincente mi ripaga del capitale che perdo con le altre) . Purtroppo le banche stanno drenando liquidità come hai detto tu per salvare il culo a degli incapaci.

Obama è assolutamente inadeguato al momento storico ( dovrebbe imparare a far di conto ed essere più umile ). Con tutto il rispetto per il presidente vorrei ricordargli che l'auto non l'hanno inventata gli americani ma i tedeschi, che la guerra in iraq iniziata 6 anni fa ad oggi è costata 750 miliardi di dollari, cifra che lui è riuscito a bruciare in soli 2 mesi di "aiuti di stato ". La green economy è una baggianata perchè ad ogni livello di quotazioni del greggio diventano vantagiose alcune soluzioni energetiche alternative: a 60 $ barile cisti bituminose, a 90$ perforazioni offshore in zone difficoltose, a 120$ eolico, a 150$ fotovolltaico. Ogni differenziale con il mercato dovrà essere finanziato con aiuti di stato.

Quindi penso che ci stiamo infilando in una depressione, non so quanto grande, sicuramente diversa da quella del 29 perchè questa coinvolge il globo ma sicuramente ci sarà una depressione.

Mi permetto di osservare che l'attuale costo delle materie prime è assolutamente "fisiologico" e che se cina e india non tirano più è perche sono venuti a mancare i mercati di sbocco per i loro prodotti tipicamente europa e america.

a) risparmiare di più per investire di più;

b) risanare le banche, o facendo fallire ed assorbire le insolventi o facendole acquisire da chi possa, da dovunque l'acquirente venga (e qui c'è tutto un libro da scrivere sul protezionismo nazionale delle banche di ogni paese, che è cruciale);

c) le prospettive d'investimento sono peggiorate. Questo può essere dovuto sia a mancanza di domanda (nel qual caso occorre chiedersi "che domanda" si può generare e come); sia a quella che io chiamo "l'ipotesi Levine", ossia che il meccanismo di crescita degli ultimi 15 anni (Cina, India ed emergenti - driven) si è inceppato a fronte del costo crescente delle materie prime. Sino a che non si riaggiusta il meccanismo di crescita, attraverso una sequenza di innovazioni che non so cosa siano e nessuno lo sa, la macchinetta della crescita mondiale non riparte.

a) sembra che, dato il crollo dei consumi, qualcosina qualcuno la cominci a risparmiare, ma continuo a non capire (testa quadra meridionale..) perchè continuiate a legare risparmio e investimenti: non sono crollati (solo) gli investimenti: le banche hanno chiuso i rubinetti a una marea di aziende, che adesso non hanno nemmeno i soldi per pagare la carta igienica e sono illiquide, falliranno e apriranno il baratro, ma gli investimenti c'entrano come i cavoli a merenda (secondo me). A meno che pagare stipendi e fornitori non sia equiparato a investimento, allora chiedo scusa e sto zitto.

b) sottoscritto al 100%, anche se poi mi fa paura la parola "nazionalizzazione".

c) In parte vedi punto a), in parte non so cosa dire sulla "ipotesi Levine", i costi crescenti di alcune materie prime sono strani: alcuni non si sono scaricati per intero sui prodotti, altri prodotti continuano a rimanere alti, nonostante il prezzo delle materie prime sia crollato, anche qui non vedo cosa c'entrino gli investimenti, che riguardano beni durevoli, ed il cui costo è andato scemando, al di là dei costi delle materi prime.

Ma non volevo fare il contrappunto al tuo post, voglio continuare a rimarcare che sento sempre più parlare di "investimenti", mentre quello che sta crollando è il funzionamento dei pagamenti "normali".

Per venire al caso di Joe, quello a cui vorresti vendere la casa, è come dire : la casa costa 1.000,00 dollari, ma Joe non ha nemmeno i soldi per pagare il fitto di 50,00 dollari, figurati se pensa a comprare...

Al di là dei contrappunti siamo d'accordo su un punto: non è una trappola della liquidità in senso classico, è una trappola bancaria. Benvenuti nel XXI secolo, monetaristi e keynesiani.

 

 

b) sottoscritto al 100%, anche se poi mi fa paura la parola "nazionalizzazione"

questo continua ad essere a mio parere un equivoco enorme: quello che erroneamente e con un istinto di marketing degno di un ippopotamo viene spacciato per nazionalizzazione delle banche altro non e' che una bankruptcy procedure secondo regole FDIC, cioè una cosa che si fa normalmente per le banche in bancarotta, e che di solito viene fatta tra il venerdi sera e il lunedi mattina se si tratta di una banca di dimensioni modeste. Siccome stiamo parlando di Citigroup e di Bank of America, questa cosa non si può fare in un fine settimana, ci vogliono mesi se non anni, per cui la banca insolvente deve rimanere sotto il controllo FDIC per lungo tempo. Non e' una nazionalizzazione se intendiamo con nazionalizzazione il controllo totale e pieno della impresa bancaria da parte del governo: questa e' una procedura di fallimento dove si regolano i rapporti esistenti della banca al momento della chiusura, si vendono gli assets, si pagano i creditori se si può, si concludono i rapporti di lavoro, etc etc. Se leggete con attenzione anche gli articoli di Krugman, è quello che pure lui propone a mio avviso, solo che lo chiama nazionalizzazione rendendolo politicamente sgradito a più della metà degli americani.

condivido.

l'uso della parola "nazionalizzazione" ha peraltro una giustificazione: occorre ricapitalizzarle, una volta fatta la procedura fallimentare. E, al momento, 2-300 miliardi da investire in "nuove" banche USA temo ce l'abbia solo il Tesoro. A meno, ovviamente, di non offrirle agli arabi o ad altri politicamente ancor meno graditi ...

E, al momento, 2-300 miliardi da investire in "nuove" banche USA temo ce l'abbia solo il Tesoro. A meno, ovviamente, di non offrirle agli arabi o ad altri politicamente ancor meno graditi ...

Gli Irlandesi stanno mostrando un po' di buonsenso almeno in questo:

DUBLIN: An Irish investment consortium with American and Middle Eastern backers is still interested in making a possible €5 billion ($6.3 billion) majority takeover of the scandal-struck, nationalized Anglo Irish Bank, the state-funded RTE broadcasters reported Friday.[...]

buonasera, io sono un vile giurista della marca trivigiana che da molto vi legge:) ... pur nulla capendo di economia .... consentite alcune domande di un profano. Devo dire che quanto scrivete circa la responsabilità delle banche non può che essere condivisa ... nn può funzionare un sistema dove nessuno paga per i propri errori. Tra l'altro, si dovrebbe discutere, tra i giuristi, se a questo punto si può parlare di "impresa" per le banche... è un dibattito che si è trascinato in italia per oltre trenta anni... all'impresa è connaturato il rischio e il fallimento... se si toglie questo... torniamo alle BIN! Leggevo una domenica una articolessa di Zingales su ILSOLE in cui scriveva che gli "aiuti" dati a CITIBANK lo scorso novembre includevano la garanzia su titoli illiquidi e su derivati per molti miliardi  di dollari. Memore di quanto ha scritto il Prof . Boldrin circa i derivati.. non è che il contribuente si sta addossando dei rischi quasi incalcolabili ... e (visto l'ammontare di carta in circolo) se gli interventi americani/europei sono congegnati in questo modo ... non è che stiano cercando di svuotare il mare con il classico secchiello? E se le risposte sono positive (xchè le banche stanno cercando di traslare il rischio della carta al contribuente)... non si potrebbe agire "Sterilizzando" giuridicamente questa carta... gli strumenti giuridici non mancano! Non si pretenderà mica che i contribuenti paghino per le scommesse altrui! Perdonate se proprio non ho capito nulla! 

"Now: how much evidence we have of this behavior? Not statistical, just anecdotical evidence. I have none. I have not heard of households withdrawing cash from banks deposits and keeping it at home. Instead, everywhere, we hear of people complaining because they cannot borrow to finance their expenditure in durable goods or what not."

Right, we do not have evidence of households withdrawing cash from banks deposits, otherwise we would have been experiencing a bank run in homeopatic doses. The U.S. data do not show this.  But this does not rule out the risk of such an event in the future. The deposit-currency ratio may decline later and contract the money stock. What we are now experiencing is a piling up of reserves, or in other words an increase of the deposit-reserve ratio (whether for precautionary reasons or lack of demand). I am purposely referring to the “great contraction” when both ratios dived, but then there was neither monetary policy nor fiscal policy as we know it. Today U.S. banks are expecting the wrath of god. Thanks god I am an atheist, but things may still happen. Money contracts if those two basic ratios decline, and it does not matter which one starts first, because the second follows suit for both accounting and economic reasons. Central banks control better the reserves, but many other factors (including expectations and fiscal policy) affect the deposit-currency ratio.

My point is, why should the two stories be seen as alternative and not instead as parallel stories that may unfold on our laps?

First, I agree 100% with Francesco Lovecchio:

why should the two stories be seen as alternative and not instead as parallel stories that may unfold on our laps?

But not only this: since you hold others to very high standards

...It's an expectations-based story (as they have finally figured out even in the anointed circles: my colleague Costas Azariadis had been claiming it since early 2007...), a story we understand very well in THEORY. Now, where's is the EVIDENCE?

you should hold yourself to the same standards. Where is your conclusive evidence (beside private conversations with spanish bankers)?

Third, the implication of your theory is extremely grim: since EVERY (almost every?) developped country is in the same situation as Japan in the 90s, letting Citibank and Bank of America fail (which I am not against at all in the US situation!) would not do that much for Spain, UK, Italy, Germany, France etc....unless we believe those two players have an impressive amount of market power in the financial world or unless you believe exports to US would completely drive the recovery of those other countries. Or unless all those countries let their major banks go as well.

Massive and generalized bank failures at the world level is what you suggest? Talking about policies affecting expectations (which to the best of my knowledge we do not know much about) this one would probably have some effects on those expectations too...so how would you distinguish in the end which mechanism drives what?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bossone: do you read what I write (and the newspapers) before commenting? I will get back to you during my next airport stop, but it is my impression you do not, so why bothering?

As for LoVecchio, no one can disagree with his hypothesis. Is a massive withdrawal of deposits and rush to "cash" by households possible? Sure. How likely is it? Well, given the available evidence, roughly as much as Ratzinger revealing he is a closet homosexual.

I agree that the two versions of the "trap" are perfectly compatible, i.e. they could BOTH be realized at any point in time. It is just a fact that, right now, there is plenty of evidence supporting one and zero evidence supporting the other. You seem to suggest you do not see the evidence apart from my "anedoctal" reports from Spain, which is what makes me wonder if you read newspapers indeed ... cheers.

Standards of empirical evidence

Where is your conclusive evidence (beside private conversations with spanish bankers)?

How about the Fed's balance sheet, where US banks are holding about $800 billion of excess reserves?

How about the evidence, available to everyone, that, in face of a Fed Funds Rate at 0.25%, American commercial banks are willing to pay substantially higher interest rates on deposits? Just ask around town. The same applies to European banks to an even greater degree.

Beside, the opinions of 2/3 of the Spanish banking system counts as "evidence" in my book.

Third, the implication of your theory is extremely grim: since ... [etc]

It is not a theory: I am just trying to make sense of facts. It is not MY fault if also many European banks are up the famous creek and have no paddles! But it is NOT true that most banks, in the US and Europe are, currently, insolvent. Many of them are stuck in a vicious circle in which, because they hold illiquid securities or derivative claims against distressed banks, they cannot operate as (for example) exercising some of their derivative claims would reveal that the counterpart has no money, hence the claim is worth nothing, etcetera ...

Beside, let me try to make clear what I believe should be done [ "clear'" so to speak, this is a blog after all and I'm sitting at Philly's airport after not one but two canceled flights!]. Failing and distressed banks should be intervened by the FDIC or its analogous in European countries (if FDIC does not have the funds, pass legislation; if it does not have the human capital, allow it to use experts from the Fed, the Comptroller of the Currency, or external consultants). There is not even the need of expropriating shareholders: the banks are worth so little that they can be paid their market value. Strip off the bad assets (this takes time: had we started a year ago we would be long done, even 6 months would have been enough ...), fire all the top management, hire new one (no musical chairs, here!), recapitalize the (now substantially smaller in assets) bank and send it back to the market by mailing its shares to the US taxpayers, in % of the taxes they paid during the last 5 years.

Basically, this is what I mean. But it need not be the only approach. There are lots of healthy banks who would not mind to purchase pieces of failing ones: let them come into the country. This is certainly true in a number of European countries, where "banking protectionism" is raising with the national central banks playing all kinds of games, while the ECB has no real power to intervene.

I am not saying the problem is simple. The facts are what they are, they cannot be changed with funny theories. Still, we should stop inventing pseudo "painless solutions", look at the facts and act accordingly. The problem is in the banks, in their balance sheets and ownership structures, in the distorted incentives that (in conjunction with the bailout approach to the problem) the former determine, leading to inaction. No public spending stimulus whatsoever will solve this situation by moving the mythological "IS curve" out of the "LM flat portion" where, supposedly, the liquidity trap is! Japan docet, while current facts and common sense confirm.

Michele,

You downplay too much the role of T-bills in my opinion.
In the last few auctions the US government has placed 60 billions dollar A MONTH of t-bills.
Monday they will place another 30 billions. The rate of return of 3 months t-bills is more or less 0.3% thus a negative real rate of return, please correct me if I am wrong. Why do people buy then? One could say: well the alternative is to have an even more negative rate of returns by buing stocks. True. But then this is just what you call "cash in the mattress". Nothing more, nothing less.

Isn't it strange that agents buy an asset with a negative rate of return?

Finally, I agree that the role of the banks is important in this crisis and that we should fix the issue, but I am not ready to rule out the sunspots channel. This does not imply that I am in favor of the fiscal stimulus: we simply do not know much on how fiscal policy affect expectations.

People purchase the assets with the best available return-risk combination, according to their expectactions. People differ in expectations. There is nothing strange in purchasing assets with a negative return, it happens all the time. Other people are purchasing other assets, with higher or even lower expected returns. Purchasing shares, for example, has generated much more negative returns recently, so I guess those purchasing T-bills were correct!

People perceive securities other than those issued by the Treasury as risky, and invest little in them. Given the realized returns, it is hard to blame those that are doing so, no? It seems to confirm the view that the available investment projects are not "good" and the amount of available saving is not "enough".

What does this have to do with sunspot? Where is the link?

 

Bravo Michele ! Sono in piedi ad applaudire ! Dopo tanto parlare in giro mi sembra la proposta più sensata che io abbia sentito negli ultimi mesi.

E mi rititorna in mente anche quel post di Alberto Bisin che chiedeva di "aprire i bilanci", l'avessero cominciato a fare allora, oggi non saremmo nella più totale oscurità , e i mercati tutto amano fuorchè l'incertezza, ma sarebbe saltata fuori la sciatteria e l'incompetenza, quindi sarebbe caduta qualche testa, e di persone che hanno un adesivo talmente potente sotto il sedere che ne vorrei conoscere la formula chimica per brevettarla.

 

Michele,

non voglio fare un commento distruttivo e neppure saltare a un nuovo problema prima di aver risolto quello corrente. La stabilità del sistema bancario è certamente una priorità. Il ritorno a condizioni normali avrà un prezzo e non penso sarà a buon mercato. Se così non fosse vorrebbe dire che finora abbiamo scherzato.

La tua proposta consente di ristabilire un normale funzionamento del sistema bancario? Ottimo, davvero. Ma saremmo solo a metà strada. Bisogna allo stesso tempo risolvere il problema degli incentivi dei manager delle banche e della loro accountability. A meno di pensare che la crisi sia unicamente il risultato di politiche monetarie troppo espansive.

 

Alcune delle proposte mi sembrano vadano esattamente nella direzione opposta. Caballero propone una soluzione che molto probabilmente non costerà nulla ai contribuenti. Ciò attraverso la concessione di una particolare opzione put agli attuali azionisti (o solo a quelli che sottoscriveranno le nuove azioni) per un periodo non molto lungo, solo una decade. Le banche saranno come sotto OPA perpetua, e immagino che questo non avrà nessun effetto sull’incentivo degli azionisti a monitorare i manager e questi ad agire massimizzando il valore d’azienda.

 

La soluzione a questo problema deve avvenire prima di mailing its shares to the US taxpayers, in % of the taxes they paid during the last 5 years. Altrimenti saremmo al punto di partenza. O forse anche peggio, essendo l’azionariato diffuso meno propenso a sostenere i costi fissi del controllo del management. Licenziare il vecchio management, cosa che caso per caso sarebbe auspicabile, non ci garantisce di ripristinare i corretti incentivi. E' nuova governace è un po' povera. Purtroppo, anche qui, non vedo una soluzione facile al problema.

 

f

 

Michele, your article looks like even more enlightening than usual. So, thank you so much. But please let me check whether I'm getting the point.

According to your story, in some sense banks' reasoning is pretty the same as household's one. On the one hand, households do not spend “because they are deeply in debt” and “saving to pay debt is the same as investing”. On the other hand, banks are not investing because they are afraid of (big and quite likely) future losses, due to households' default or derivatives or whatever. So this could be seen “same as investing” as well, couldn't it?

This argument should imply that (i) a bank can accept to finance a project only if the expected gain from it is higher than the benefit from keeping that money, so as to face the expected future losses; (ii) for the government, giving pile of cash to the banks could be effective (I'm saying “effective”, not “a good idea”!) only to the extent that this money is enough to significantly limit the risk of insolvency (if the bank receives enough money to compensate the expected losses, then it may start to invest in other projects again...). But presumably much more money should be needed than the government wants to (or can) spend.

Is this correct?

If it is, let me also ask you in what sense you say this is “a principal-agent trap" and, finally, why

 

to the extent that four or five very big players have a decisive impact on the US interbank market, "lending little" is clearly a dominant strategy.

 

Thank you so much.

 

 

Scive il commentarista macroeconomico del BIAM di Marzo (non sono io, non mi sto autocitando):

Sin embargo el problema no es (sólo) si las pérdidas sumarán 200.000 o 400.000 millones de dólares: el problema es principalmente la confusión, la falta de transparencia y de información atendible, que continúa generando desconfianza en el sistema bancario y financiero. Reconstruir esta confianza es una condición necesaria para la recuperación económica. El debate sobre si este fin se puede lograr de forma más rápida y efectiva recapitalizando los bancos con dinero público o nacionalizando los bancos en dificultad, no elimina este hecho fundamental. Si no se recupera el normal funcionamiento del sistema bancario y financiero se condena la economía mundial a una parálisis operativa durante la cual todos los recursos disponibles se utilizaran para financiar la masa enorme de deudas inexigibles, asfixiando los mercados de bienes duraderos y la inversión productiva. Los gobiernos, que han visto desaparecer exactamente de esta forma una cantidad enorme de liquidez, deberían plantearse estrategias más eficaces o por lo menos ser conscientes de que la reactivación del crédito no pasa por la trasformación en deuda publica de los créditos inexigibles de los bancos. El dinero que se inyecta ahora en el sistema bancario no se transformará en inversión ni en consumo: sólo sirve para garantizar la supervivencia de los mismos bancos.

Ed ha ragione da vendere.

In giorni come questi, dove la folle decisione di continuare a mantenere in vita degli zombi come AIG a botte di centinaia di miliardi di soldi pubblici, ci costa non solo altri 60 inutili miliardi ma un ulteriore ondata di panico nei mercati, comincio a provare forti sentimenti di rabbia impotente verso le autorità politiche e monetarie che continuano ad indugiare ed a "salvare" il sistema finanziario alimentando perdite e follie dell'esistente a carido del contribuente! Il conflitto fra interesse pubblico ed interessi privati, di bancari e banchieri, non potrebbe essere più plateale che in queste circostanze!

Come non capire che il processo di distruzione di valore e di "aspirazione di fondi pubblici" generato dall'esistenza di una montagna di contratti derivati tanto inutili all'economia reale quanto profittevoli per chi può esigerne il pagamento da parte dei contribuenti (con la sussidiata istituzione di controparte come intermediaria), non finirà tanto presto se non si decide di dare ad esso un taglio d'impero?

Esistono centinaia, migliaia di miliardi di prodotti derivati "out there" e chiunque ne possieda con un valore positivo ne esigerà il pagamento (ossia, esigerà che il contratto sottostante venga soddisfatto) tutte le volte che sa che il rischio di credito della sua controparte è coperto dai soldi pubblici. Chi esigerebbe ad AIG di far fede ai propri CDS se non sapesse che AIG ha dietro il Tesoro degli USA?

Ecco quindi che chiunque abbia in mano un CDS venduto da AIG o un MBS emesso da Citi, eccetera, ne chiede l'esecuzione o la soddisfazione delle condizioni contrattuali. Un processo infinito che (1) da un lato non inietta nel sistema creditizio soldi usabili per dare credito alle imprese (chiunque riceva il pagamento, o si siede su questi soldi o li nasconde da qualche parte ben consapevole del rischio che corre nel caso sia in posizione debitoria su altri assets) e, (2), generando continua incertezza sul destino finale di metà delle banche USA ed una buona quota di banche europee, alimenta il panico e la fuga dalla borsa di chiunque non sia o un insider o un temerario. Tutto questo dura da quasi due anni.

L'indecisione delle autorità monetarie e finanziarie USA, ed ora anche di quelle europee, mi sembra essere oramai passata dalla colpa al dolo.

E se l'ondata di sfiducia dei consumatori, contrariamente a quanto si dice sui media, fosse completamente giustificata dalla paura per le fosche nubi stataliste che si stanno addensando sul mondo? Ci dobbiamo preoccupare o no? Forse per il destino delle banche no, ma per il nuovo Leviatano sì.

Hai una qualche evidenza a supporto di questa ipotesi? Io non ne vedo alcuna.

Non c'è evidenza, ovviamente, tranne un'infinita storia di insuccessi che testimoniano l'intrinseca incapacità dello stato (e delle banche centrali) nell'affrontare le crisi finanziarie. Maggiori vincoli nel mercato del lavoro, dirigismo industriale, più tassazione non hanno mai risolto nessun problema, tantomeno quelli dei più svantaggiati: al massimo possono approfondire e trascinare una crisi finanziaria per anni. Certo, sono un profano, ma l'Obamanomics non promette nulla di buono. Spero di sbagliarmi.

Hai completamente cambiato argomento.  Adesso hai messo delle affermazioni generiche su Obamanomics e lo statalismo, anche in gran parte condivisibili.  Ma che non c'entrano niente con quello che dicevi prima (xxxxxx), e cioe che i consumatori non spendono perche han paura dell'intervento dello stato.

Per me i consumatori non acquistano automobili perche han letto che il GDP e' sceso del 6,2% su base annnua, perche' han sentito che sono aumentati i licenziamenti e perche' han difficolta a ottenere un prestito per comprarla (avendo gia molti debiti).  Sono spiegazioni piu concrete che una specie di sciopero dei consumatori per ragioni ideologiche (per il quale secondo me non vi e' evidenza).

Cerco di essere più preciso. La mia congettura è che parte del pessimismo dei consumatori americani possa essere spiegata anche dal fondato timore che il massiccio intervento statale promosso da Obama abbia in sé la potenzialità di aggravare la crisi in atto, rallentando il necessario aggiustamento dell'economia, sia nella struttura produttiva che in quella finanziaria. In questo caso non si tratterebbe di sciopero ideologico, ma dell'anticipazione razionale di maggiori imposte e costi futuri. Possibilissimo che sia io a sbagliarmi e che invece gli americani non aspettino altro che qualcuno gli tolga oggi le castagne dal fuoco, senza curarsi dei costi che dovranno pagare domani.

[Parziale OT]

Duro post di Buiter sullo stato della macro accademica e la sua (ir)rilevanza per le banche centrali

I am not sure if we can count this as evidence that we are in a "banking liquidity trap", but I find this quite depressing.

...che la fed sta agendo in modo non indipendente e senza guardare alle conseguenze di lungo periodo del suo operato, che il pericolo è l'inflazione e non la deflazione, che lo stimulus plan di obama non aiuta la produttività a crescere, ma che crea artificialmente e a costi enormi un po' di posti di lavoro. Parrebbe che il nytimes si sia accorto che non esiste solo paul krugman (che oggi, comunque scrive ancora "we basically need more: more stimulus, more decisive action on the banks, more job creation").

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/04/opinion/04meltzer.html?pagewanted=1

Some of my fellow economists, including many at the Fed, say that the big monetary goal is to avoid deflation. They point to the less than 1 percent decline in the consumer price index for the year ending in March as evidence that deflation is a threat. But this statistic is misleading: unstable food and energy prices may lower the price index for a few months, but deflation (or inflation) refers to the sustained rate of change of prices, not the price level. We should look instead at a less volatile price index, the gross domestic product deflator. In this year’s first quarter, it rose 2.9 percent — a sure sign of inflation. Besides, no country facing enormous budget deficits, rapid growth in the money supply and the prospect of a sustained currency devaluation as we are has ever experienced deflation. These factors are harbingers of inflation.When will it come? Surely not right away. But sooner or later, we will see the Fed, under pressure from Congress, the administration and business, try to prevent interest rates from increasing. The proponents of lower rates will point to the unemployment numbers and the slow recovery. That’s why the Fed must start to demonstrate the kind of courage and independence it has not recently shown.Milton Friedman often said that “inflation was always and everywhere a monetary phenomenon.” The members of the Federal Reserve seem to dismiss this theory because they concentrate excessively on the near term and almost never discuss the medium- and long-term consequences of their actions. That’s a big error. They need to think past current political pressures and unemployment rates. For the next few years, they cannot neglect rising inflation.

Meltzer forse usa argomentazioni da "vecchio monetarista"...che però mi suonano ugualmente simpatiche. Ho postato qui perché mi pare che si fosse detto nei commenti a questo post (ma posso ricordare male) che articoli con tesi di questo genere (o meglio: non dell'ordine "we need a (new_deal)2) sul nytimes non si riuscisse a trovarne uno: forse i tempi son cambiati.

 

Era nella posta di stamattina:

New York Fed Chairman Stephen Friedman's ties to Goldman Sachs started raising questions once the firm became a bank holding company. The case illustrates what a tangle of overlapping interests can arise at a hybrid institution like the New York Federal Reserve Bank, especially as the U.S. government, in addressing the financial and economic turmoil, grows ever more deeply enmeshed in American business and banking.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124139546243981801.html#mod=djemalertNEWS

How is this for logic?  From the WSJ article on Friedman buying 37,300 more shares of Goldman stock after getting a waiver from the NY Fed to hold the shares he altready owned.

"Because he was wasn't allowed to own the stock he had, the Fed doesn't consider his additional December purchase to be at odds with its rules at the time. The Fed had no policy requiring directors to inform it of new stock purchases, and Mr. Friedman didn't. The Federal Reserve Board is now in the process of rewriting its rules for handling situations like Mr. Friedman's."

The New York guys seem to have lost touch with reality.

 

 

A cui ho risposto:

Oh no, my dear XYZ. The NY guys are very much in "touch" with "reality", lots more than we are, and it shows in their "superior status" ...

"They know things you people wouldn't believe..." :-)

The Fed had no policy requiring directors to inform it of new stock purchases, and Mr. Friedman didn't. The Federal Reserve Board is now in the process of rewriting its rules for handling situations like Mr. Friedman's

 

Incredibile che debbano pensarci ora. Assurdo. 

Ieri sera ho notato il titolone sul sito del WSJ e ho provato a leggere l'articolo ma il contenuto era gated e non sono riuscito a capire di cosa si parlasse; grazie per aver postato qualcosa a riguardo.

Intanto, i nuovi zimbelli della blogosfera sembrano essere i c.d. "stress test" fatti dalle banche; le accuse di manipolazione già si sprecano. (KrugmanKwak)

 

Per chi se lo fosse perso, questo è un interessante esempio di buon giornalismo investigativo da parte del NYT.

(suggerisco a chi vuole vedere subito i fuochi d'artificio di saltare direttamente a pag. 6).

Che cattivoni di NfA, avete costretto il povero (anzi no, ricco) Stephen Friedman alle dimissioni:

Recent Developments

Stephen Friedman resigns as chairman of the New York Fed’s board of directors

Thu, May 7

 

Magari fosse merito nostro!

Meglio di niente, ma una goccia nel mare.

Se si riuscisse a far dimettere Geithner e Summers, allora sì che potremmo dire di aver fatto qualche passo avanti. Non che qualcuno, più ascoltato di noi negli USA, non ci provi. In altri tempi i fatti riportati anche in un solo articolo così sarebbero stati più che sufficienti per provocare le dimissioni.  Posso anche dire per conoscenza diretta che il sentimento di insofferenza e disagio verso la situazione che in questi anni, ed ora particolarmente, si è venuta determinando sia ai vertici della Fed di NY, sia del Tesoro sia, seppur in maniera meno grave, al Board, sta crescendo in modo sostanziale nelle Fed regionali. Vediamo se porta ad ulteriori risultati in tempo breve. Il problema vero è che "Obama-teflon", avendoseli scelti, continua a coprirli. La qual cosa certo non depone per nulla a suo favore.

Inizia una nuova discussione

Login o registrati per inviare commenti